CFP International Society for Heresy Studies

Dissenting Experience is a research group devoted to investigating the history of religious nonconformity in Britain, c.1500–c.1800. We have particular interests in the historical and literary study of church books, registers, and related records from Baptist, Congregational, and Presbyterian churches, 1640–1714. Dissenting Experience is a collaboration between Rachel Adcock (Keele), Michael Davies (Liverpool), Anne Dunan-Page (Aix-Marseille), Joel Halcomb (UEA), with research assistance from Mark Burden (2015-2016).

Original author: Anne Page
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Early Modern Religious Dissents and Radicalism Series

This is a new series edited by Routledge:

“Titles in the Early Modern Religious Dissents and Radicalism Series address the discursive constructions of religious dissent and the practices of radical movements in the early modern world. The series transcends traditional national and confessional historiographies to examine early modern religious culture as a dynamic system that was essential in forging complex identities and encouraging dialogue among them. The editors seek manuscripts that consider questions of dissent, radicalism, dissidence, libertinism, heresy, and heterodoxy, and examine these themes historically as socio-cultural constructions”, see https://emodir.hypotheses.org/emodir-routledge-series

Series Editors

Federico Barbierato

Hannah Marcus

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EMODIR research blog

Dissenting Experience is a research group devoted to investigating the history of religious nonconformity in Britain, c.1500–c.1800. We have particular interests in the historical and literary study of church books, registers, and related records from Baptist, Congregational, and Presbyterian churches, 1640–1714. Dissenting Experience is a collaboration between Rachel Adcock (Keele), Michael Davies (Liverpool), Anne Dunan-Page (Aix-Marseille), Joel Halcomb (UEA), with research assistance from Mark Burden (2015-2016).

Original author: Anne Page
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Remembrance and Re-appropriation: Shaping Dissenting Identities

The IJBS Regional Day conference entitled ‘Remembrance and Re-appropriation: Shaping Dissenting Identities’ will take place this year Friday 13 April 2018 at Keel University (Staffordshire).

Plenary Speakers: Johanna Harris (Exeter) and John Coffey (Leicester).

For the conference programme and registration please click here.

Original author: Anne Page
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The Revd Dr Brendan Bradshaw (1937-2017)

The Faculty has been saddened to learn of the passing of our former colleague, the Revd Dr Brendan Bradshaw, in Ireland, on Sunday, 10 December 2017.

Brendan Bradshaw was born in Limerick City, studied at University College Dublin, and ordained as a Marist Father.  During his many years at Queens’ College, as a fellow and later life fellow, and as a lecturer in this Faculty, Dr Bradshaw made powerful contributions to the study of early modern Britain and Ireland that continue to shape our understanding of the period.  

His volume The British Problem c. 1534-1707: State Formation in the Atlantic Archipelago (1996), co-edited with John Morrill, was a landmark moment in the development of a de-centred ‘three kingdoms’ approach to the study of Tudor and Stuart politics, located equally within the wider context created by the European Reformations. The book grew out of a third-year specified subject, which enthused cohorts of undergraduates and has inspired similar courses still taught at other major universities.

In his subsequent work British Consciousness and Identity: the making of Britain, 1533-1707 (1998), co-edited with Peter Roberts, he brought together historians and literary scholars to address the meaning of nationality itself within early modern political and intellectual culture.  

Dr Bradshaw’s seminal interventions the history of Irish nationalism were collected in his final book, ‘And so began the Irish Nation’: Nationality, National Consciousness and Nationalism in Pre-modern Ireland, published in 2015.  

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Shakespeare in Italy Summer School

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.011 Wednesday, 24 January 2018

 

From:        Kristin Backert

Date:         January 21, 2018 at 9:39:12 PM EST

Subject:    Shakespeare in Italy Summer School

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John Barton Dies at 89

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.010  Wednesday, 24 January 2018

 

[1] From:        Hardy M. Cook

     Date:         January 20, 2018 at 8:24:06 AM EST

     Subj:         John Barton Dies at 89

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Francisco Prado-Vilar (Harvard): "Nostos: The Poetics of Matter and the Transfiguration of Myth in Medieval Sculpture"

February 13, 2018 - 5:30pm to 7:00pm

OSHMAN HALL, MCMURTRY BUILDING

“It is nostos that you seek, O radiant Odysseus,” said the prophet Tiresias to the Greek hero in Homer's  epic poem of return. Taking nostos as both a theme and a critical concept for the study of Nachleben der Antike (Afterlife of Antiquity) this lecture proposes a journey punctuated by a series of encounters with a selected group of masterpieces of medieval sculpture that have remained until recently inscrutable in their meaning, and largely overlooked despite their brilliant plastic execution. In the course of an analysis that involves critical engagements with the thought of authors as varied as Fulgentius the Mythographer and Aby Warburg, Dante and James Joyce, these works will reveal themselves as essential case studies to delve into the complexities of the processes of survival and reawakening of classical literary and figural imagery in the Middle Ages, including iconographic transformations, and the poiesis of their embodiment through gesture, memory and the material imagination. This trans-historical nostos culminates in the Portal of Glory of the Cathedral of Santiago, which will be here analyzed in light of the new discoveries produced during the ongoing restoration project.

Francisco Prado-Vilar is Scientific Director of the Andrew W. Mellon Program for the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela, and Director of Art and Culture at Harvard’s Real Colegio Complutense (RCC). His research and publications focus on diverse aspects of the arts of medieval and early Modern Europe, covering topics of wide chronological, thematic, and methodological range, including the afterlife of Antiquity from the early Middle Ages to the Renaissance; Romanesque and Gothic monumental programs; intercultural relations among Christians, Muslims, and Jews in the Gothic period; the interface of private suffering, devotional painting, and national trauma in Hispano-Flemish painting; or the interconnections between medievalism and modernity. Among his most recent publications is the edited volume The Portal of Glory: Architecture, Matter, and Vision.

Original author: Mae Lyons-Penner
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Emanuele Lugli: "The Transfiguration of Measure and the Heights of Christ"

February 6, 2018 - 5:30pm to 7:00pm

OSHMAN HALL, MCMURTRY BUILDING

This talk focuses on the singular devotion for the 'mensura Christi,' or the act of praying with objects that reproduced the height of Christ. It explores the reasons for its phenomenal success, from its diffusion in the twelfth century up to its ban in the seventeenth, and the motives for its equally extraordinary absence in historical accounts today. The talk asks questions about what turns an orthodox veneration into a mere superstition, an inversion that is all the more puzzling given that the 'mensura Christi' relies on measuring, one of the methods to fight credulity. The lecture thus reconsiders the relationship of measuring practices and visual belief while assessing the validity of 'trans-figuration' as an art historical concept, thus contributing to discussions on representations, faith, and material studies.

Emanuele Lugli teaches and writes about art, architecture and visual culture in medieval and early modern Europe, with a particular emphasis on Mediterranean trade, technology, and intellectual connections. His theoretical concerns include questions of scale and labor, the history of measurements, notions of precision and vagueness, the making of fashion and the fabrication of networks.

Original author: Mae Lyons-Penner
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Henrike Christiane Lange (Art History and Italian, Berkeley): "A Compass for Relief Theory"

January 30, 2018 - 5:30pm to 7:00pm

Oshman Hall, McMurtry Building

How can we calibrate a scholar’s compass on a journey into the history of relief sculpture? In a world that privileges the flat image on canvas or computer screen, and still reveres sculpture in the round, I propose to rehabilitate relief as a driving force in the history of art. Visual relief effects across media help to form cultural environments by intertwining collective and individual modes of perception. Considering relief as symbolic form, three case studies from the Medieval Baltic, Renaissance Mediterranean, and Global Contemporary sequentially raise the question of presence, individualization, and democratization as categories for a dynamic theory of relief. This project relates brick reliefs from Baltic cathedrals to the artistic dialogue between Donatello and Mantegna in sculpture and painting as a crucial moment for the intellectual foundations of early modernity. Finally, modern brick relief sculpture and contemporary practices of relief carving in North America indicate the persistence of the medium as cultural agent into the present day.

Henrike C. Lange holds a joint appointment in the Departments of Art History and Italian Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. She specializes in European medieval and early modern art, architecture, visual culture, and literature in relation to the Mediterranean. Lange has a second area of expertise in nineteenth and twentieth century historiography, literature, and art in Europe and the United States. Her scholarship focuses on questions of perspective, narrative, medium, materiality, and metaphysics in specific historical contexts. Lange’s art historical practice and teaching are informed by her curatorial background and work experience in German, Italian, American, and British museum collections. Henrike Lange is a Distinguished Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study at the University of Notre Dame (2017-2018) where she is preparing her current book manuscript, Giotto’s Triumph: The Arena Chapel, the Roman Jubilee of 1300, and the Question of Modernity.

Original author: Mae Lyons-Penner
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Mackenzie Cooley (Stanford, History) "Rape of the New World: Metaphor, Rape, Conquest"

February 27, 2018 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm

This presentation is part of the Trauma and History Workshop: Plague, Fire, War, and Rebellion.

Original author: Mae Lyons-Penner
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Kevin Terraciano (UCLA): "Memories of the War in Mexico Tenochtitlan"

February 20, 2018 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm

This presentation is part of the Trauma and History Workshop: Plague, Fire, War, and Rebellion.

Original author: Mae Lyons-Penner
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Sigrun Haude (Arizona): "Facing the Trauma of the Thirty Years' War"

February 6, 2018 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm

This presentation is part of the Trauma and History Workshop: Plague, Fire, War, and Rebellion.

Original author: Mae Lyons-Penner
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Graylin Harrison (Stanford, Art History): "Representing Naples: The Revolt of 1647-8"

January 30, 2018 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm

Stanford Art History graduate student Graylin Harrison discusses violent images of the Neapolitan Revolt of 1647-48, known to historians as the Revolt of Massaniello. The revolt in Naples became emblematic of social disorder and the violence of crowd rule during the political upheavals of the seventeenth century.

This presentation is part of the Trauma and History Workshop: Plague, Fire, War, and Rebellion.

Original author: Mae Lyons-Penner
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Chet Van Duzer: "Making the World Go 'Round: How Urbano Monte Created his Map of 1587"

February 23, 2018 - 3:30pm

David Rumsey Map Center, Bing Wing of Green Library

On February 23rd at 3.30 pm, the David Rumsey Map Center will have on display the original 430 year old Urbano Monte 1587 map long with its 10 feet by 10 feet facsimile and its virtual derivatives at the Center.  This will be followed by a talk featuring Chet van Duzer, History of Cartography scholar and recent David and Abby Rumsey Fellow at the David Rumsey Map Center and the John Carter Brown Library in Boston. Chet will be presenting on his research conducted over the course of 3 months on the Urbano Monte 1587 map. 

The talk is entitled: Making the World Go 'Round: How Urbano Monte Created his Map of 1587

Urbano Monte's map of 1587 is a spectacular creation, designed to be assembled into an image of the world 10.5 feet in diameter, on an unusual projection, intended to be rotated about its center, and elaborately decorated with images of sovereigns, sea monsters, and animals. In this talk Chet Van Duzer will present new research how Urbano Monte went about making the map: the events and works that inspired him, the sources from which he borrowed, and his own statements about the map.

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Arguing with Edmund Spenser in Contemporary Irish Poetry

Thursday 15th February, 7-9pm
Poetry Ireland, 11 Parnell Square East, Dublin 1.
Tickets: Free, but limited – booking advised. Info from Poetry Ireland website.

The Tudor poet, Edmund Spenser, is not remembered fondly in Ireland, despite his having written most of his major works while living here as a planter and colonial administrator in the late sixteenth century, and despite the interest of W.B. Yeats in his potential uses as an Irish poet. The reasons for this disfavour are all too easy to identify: Spenser’s vicious polemic against both the native Irish and the descendants of the Norman settlers who had become ‘more Irish than the Irish themselves’ (as the saying goes) in his political dialogue, A View of the Present State of Ireland.

But Spenser has been an increasingly noticeable presence in contemporary Irish poetry, prompting exploration not just of the darker moments of Irish history during the plantations, and their implications for Ireland today, but also of the opportunities for reflection and even self-examination his poetry offers an Irish reader – and ultimately, perhaps, a re-evaluation of the usual narratives of the Irish literary tradition.

The School of English, Drama, Film and Creative Writing, University College Dublin and Poetry Ireland invite you to join five poets who have been thinking and arguing with Spenser in their recent work for an evening of discussion and readings: John McAuliffe (The Way In (2015)), Trevor Joyce (Fastness (2017)), Leanne O’Sullivan (A Quarter of an Hour (2018)), Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill (Ireland Professor of Poetry (2001-2004)), and current Ireland Professor of Poetry Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin (The Boys of Bluehill (2015)).

Tickets: Free, but limited – booking advised here.

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CFP: Scenes in the Other’s Language (UGA, Nov 1-3, 2018)

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.008  Thursday, 18 January 2018

 

From:        Sujata Iyengar

Original author: Hardy

Shakespeare Across the Disciplines

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 29.007  Thursday, 18 January 2018

 

From:        Jeffrey Robert Wilson

Date:         January 16, 2018 at 3:03:47 PM EST

Subject:    Shakespeare Across the Disciplines

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Stephen Harrison (Corpus Christi College, Oxford): The Roman Novel in France: Apuleius and La Fontaine

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January 19, 2018 - 12:30pm to 1:30pm

This talk is part of a larger project looking at the reception of the long two-book love story of Cupid (Amor or ‘Love’ in Latin) and Psyche (‘Soul’ in Greek), which forms the centrepiece of the Latin novel Metamorphoses or The Golden Ass by the second-century CE writer Apuleius, in European literature, art and opera from 1600 to the present day. Apuleius’ tale narrates how the beautiful princess Psyche gains the enmity of Venus, goddess of love, but the love of Venus’ son Cupid, and how after a series of tribulations and adventures (involving jealous sisters, a husband of mysterious identity, a dramatic revelation scene and an epic-style journey to the Underworld) the two are united in happy marriage and Psyche becomes a goddess. The talk deals with the influential French adaptation (1669) of the tale by Jean La Fontaine, author of the famous Fables, which formed the basis for several adaptations of the story in the time of Louis XIV and the fairy tale of Beauty and the Beast. All French and Latin will be translated.

Stephen Harrison has been teaching Classics at Corpus Christi College, Oxford since 1987 and is Professor of Latin Literature at the University of Oxford. His main research and teaching interests are in Latin literature and its reception. He has written books on Virgil, Horace and on the Roman novelist Apuleius, and has edited, co-edited or co-authored more than twenty books on Virgil, Horace, the Roman Novel, Classics, and literary theory–as well as Latin literature in general and on the reception of classical literature. He is an occasional visiting professor at the Universities of Copenhagen and Trondheim and currently serving as William H. Bonsall Visiting Professor at Stanford University.

Event Sponsor: 

Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, Department of Classics

Original author: Anonymous
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A Dubious Death

Over the past couple of weeks I have been reading through some of the correspondence of the Radcliffe Family, who lived in Hitchin in the eighteenth century.

Sir Ralph Radcliffe

One case has been copied out of the notes of Sir Hans Sloane, a successful medical practitioner who treated Queen Anne and Kings George I and II. This case explains the strange case of Jeremy Radcliffe’s death in 1691. Jeremy was one of three sons born to Ralph Radcliffe, who came to Hitchin from Lancashire and settled the family there. Jeremy’s death evidently aroused some interest, because he apparently died twice.

The case explains,

When Jeremy Ratcliffe seemed to me to be quite deed by means of the application of warmth to his head and cold to his side and to the soles of his feet & by a cordial potion injected with a syringe. In a very short time contrary to all expectation He returned to life for a while; but not for long, for some days he was walking with his friends assisted by the table, accomplishing this being sick and languid; but in the space of three days or at the most four days he died

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