Irish Renaissance Seminar, 18 Nov, TCD: Full programme announced

This blog is designed to draw together academic events, plays and research in early modern literature across the island of Ireland.

Created by Dr. Derek Dunne (unifr.academia.edu/DerekDunne) and Dr. Emily O'Brien (tcd.academia.edu/EmilyOBrien), with Dr. Edel Semple (ucc-ie.academia.edu/EdelSemple).

Contact us with news and events at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and follow us on Twitter at @shakesinireland

Original author: Emily Y. O'Brien

Digital Manuscripts Workshop

December 1, 2017 - 9:30am to 12:30pm

A growing number of images from cultural heritage institutions around the world are available for use and re-use by scholars through the International Image Interoperability Framework (http://iiif.io). This framework and community facilitates comparison of materials across repositories through a common protocol. It also allows for the use of a number of lightweight tools that can be hosted at your institution, or on your laptop, for viewing, annotation, transcription, and collection-building. This workshop will focus on discovery of interoperable resources, building collections of resources for teaching and research, and the use of tools that support these activities. No previous experience with IIIF is required. Each participant will get hands-on experience gathering materials from across the web, working with software tools to compare and annotate those materials, and with ample time for in-workshop experimentation and discussion.

Original author: Mae Lyons-Penner
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Connoisseurship and the Knowledge of Art in the Netherlands, 1400 to the present

CALL FOR PAPERS: NEDERLANDS KUNSTHISTORISCH JAARBOEK, VOL. 69, 2019
 

 
Connoisseurship has long been suspect. Though essential to the study of material objects, it has been opposed to the more ‘substantive’ discipline of academic art history, and reviled as outmoded and elitist, as tainted by the market, and as concerned merely with such artist-reifying/mystifying issues as attribution, authenticity and the autograph ‘hand’. The connoisseur – with typically his ‘eye’ – has been dismissed as a dinosaur.
 
Yet, the practice of connoisseurship has continued apace – indeed, has been reinvented – in print rooms and museums, in the venues of the art market, and in the monographic projects, large and small, that have catalogued and re-catalogued the works of major and minor masters, now with the aid of ever changing methods of technical investigation. In the Netherlands, the Rembrandt Research Project; seven-volume Rembrandt: The New Hollstein, of 2013; and Corpus Rubenianum have relied on and advanced the methods of connoisseurship. So too have such collaborative investigative initiatives as the Bosch Project and Lasting Support: An Interdisciplinary Research Project to Assess the Structural Condition of the Ghent Altarpiece, which led to the cleaning of Van Eyck’s masterpiece.
 
Recently, moreover, connoisseurship has been historicized and theorized. Recognizing early modern connoisseurship as a kind of knowledge-based expertise that was the purview of kunstkenners and liefhebbers (art lovers), as opposed to naamkoopers (name buyers), has shed light on historical notions of authenticity, originality, quality, style, judgment, and discernment, as well as on the practices of art making and collecting, of workshop practices and collaboration. Understood in the context of its historical development, and through such early interlocutors as Van Mander, Van Hoogstraten, De Lairesse, Bosse, and De Piles, connoisseurship takes on new dimensions, as do its problematic aspects, such as its association with the practices (and malpractices) of art dealers. Theorized as a method of visual analysis, connoisseurship has been given new life – as a ‘new connoisseurship’ – in its association with technical art history and the scientific investigation of works of art, with intuition and neuroscience, as well as with the computational analysis of large data sets.
 
This volume of the NKJ seeks proposals that explore the connoisseurship – and the connoisseur – of Netherlandish art by bringing together new research into their history, recent practice, and conceptualization. Questions to consider include, but are not limited to:

What is the relation between connoisseurship and our understanding of style, quality, and the history of taste, and of concepts of the artist? How can new insights into early modern artistic practices, and into the attitudes of painters, kenners and liefhebbers towards authorship, impact present day practices of attribution and notions of ‘authentic’ or ‘autograph’ works? How can we think about connoisseurship across media? Are interpretations of the results of technical investigations nothing other than classical connoisseurship? Or do these apparently objective methods make connoisseurship rooted in the personal experience of the connoisseur obsolete? Can the ‘new connoisseurship’ raise new questions and alter the traditional goals and objectives of connoisseurship? Can cognitive and neuro-scientific research provide evidence about how and why connoisseurship works? How are seeing and knowing related, and how were they considered to be related in the past? What is the future of connoisseurship and do we need a better term for these practices?

 
The NKJ is dedicated to a particular theme each year and promotes innovative scholarship and articles that employ a diversity of approaches to the study of Netherlandish art in its wider context. For more information, see
http://www.brill.com/publications/netherlands-yearbook-history-art-neder...
 
Contributions to the NKJ (in Dutch, English, German or French) are limited to a maximum of 7,500 words, excluding notes and bibliography. Following a peer review process and receipt of the complete text, the editorial board will make final decisions on the acceptance of papers.
 
Please send a 500-word proposal and a short CV to the volume editors by January 15, 2018:
 
H. Perry Chapman This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Dulcia Meijers This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
Schedule:
15 January 2018: Deadline for submission of proposals.
February 2018: Notifications about proposals.
1 May 2018: Deadline for submission of first drafts.
August 2018: Comments by reviewers and editors to contributors.
December 2018: Final drafts.
Spring 2019: Images ready, copy editing, print proofs for correction.
Winter 2019: Publication.

Original author: RWillie
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Post at Newcastle

© Society for Renaissance Studies 2017

Original author: RWillie
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Burkhardt at 200

An interdisciplinary conference to be held at the British Academy, London

 

The bicentenary of the birth of the Swiss scholar, Jacob Burckhardt (25 May 1818 - 8 August 1897), author of Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy (1860), seems an appropriate moment at which take stock and consider whether or not the idea of an ‘Italian Renaissance’ is still a hermeneutically helpful one. This conference will task an interdisciplinary team of scholars of Renaissance studies as well as of Burckhardt himself to interrogate both the Swiss historian’s own agenda as well as the contemporary validity and helpfulness of the label ‘Italian Renaissance’. Specific reference will be made to the themes treated in his classic account: the state as a work of art; development of the individual; revival of antiquity; discovery of the world and of man; society and festivals; morality and religion.

 

Speakers: Robert Black (Leeds, Emeritus), Jill Burke (Edinburgh), Virginia Cox (NYU Villa La Pietra, Florence), Wietse de Boer (Miami, Ohio), Marco Gentile (Parma), Mary Laven (Cambridge), Mikkel Mangold (Basel), Giuseppe Marcocci (Oxford), Sarah Ross (Boston), Nicholas Terpstra (Toronto), Joan-Pau Rubies (Barcelona Pompeu Fabre), Will Stenhouse (Yeshiva, New York), Claudia Wedepohl (Warburg Institute) and Barbara von Reibnitz (Basel)

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Seminar: Prof Patricia Palmer, “A Limerick Jesuit in the Green Atlantic”, Centre for Early Modern Studies Limerick, 15 Nov 2017

Seminar: Prof Patricia Palmer, “A Limerick Jesuit in the Green Atlantic”, Centre for Early Modern Studies Limerick, 15 Nov 2017 | Shakespeare in Ireland
Original author: Emily Y. O'Brien

Musical Culture in the Wars of Religion, 1550-1650

St Catharine's College, Cambridge

 

Talks by:

Peter Bennett (Case Western Reserve) Marie-Alexis Colin (Brussels) Tom Hamilton (Cambridge) Kat Hill (Birkbeck) David van der Linden (Groningen) Margaret McGowan (Sussex) Emilie Murphy (York) David Potter (Kent) Alex Robinson (Cambridge) John Romey (Case Western Reserve) Daniel Trocmé Latter (Cambridge)and featuring a lecture-recital by Edward Wickham and the Choir of St Catharine's College, Cambridge of the Dodecacorde of Claude Le Jeune Edward Wickham (Cambridge)

 

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Dr John Guy biography of Mary, Queen of the Scots adapted as a feature film

last modified Nov 08, 2017 10:23 AM

Dr John Guy's biography My Heart is My Own: The Life of Mary Queen of Scots is being adapted as a feature film with Saoirse Ronan as Mary and Margot Robbie as Queen Elizabeth.

More information here

Dr John Guy biography of Mary, Queen of the Scots adapted as a feature film

last modified Nov 08, 2017 10:23 AM

Dr John Guy's biography My Heart is My Own: The Life of Mary Queen of Scots is being adapted as a feature film with Saoirse Ronan as Mary and Margot Robbie as Queen Elizabeth.

More information here

Irish Renaissance Seminar meeting, TCD, 18 November, 1–4.30pm

The next biannual meeting of the Irish Renaissance Seminar will be held at Trinity College Dublin on Saturday, 18 November 2017 at 1–4.30pm.

Full details will be posted shortly!

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Gaiety School of Acting Shakespeare Schools Programme: King Lear (Cork and Dublin)

The Gaiety School of Acting Shakespeare Schools Programme presents King Lear. A run at Dean Crowe theatre in Athlone has already been completed, with dates remaining in Cork and Dublin cities at Firkin Crane and Smock Alley theatres respectively.

The Gaiety School of Acting – The National Theatre School of Ireland is offering Leaving Cert. students a unique opportunity.

The Gaiety School of Acting is delighted to launch our 2017 production of King Lear. This production will travel to Smock Alley Theatre, Dublin, Firkin Crane, Cork and The Dean Crowe Theatre, Athlone from the 23rd of October to the 1st December.

This is the 5th year of our Shakespeare Schools programme and in 2016 we performed Hamlet for almost 6500 students from 130 schools. This means that almost 1 in every 9 students sitting their leaving Certificate English exams in June will have seen our production. We are excited to once again provide students with the opportunity to see Shakespeare’s work live.

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SBReviews: SHAKSPER Book Reviews Seeking Reviewers

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.283  Monday, 6 November 2017

 

From:        Annalisa Castaldo <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         November 1, 2017 at 5:43:54 PM EDT

Subject:    SBReviews: SHAKSPER Book Reviews Seeking Reviewers

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Speaking of Shakespeare with WNET's Stephen Segaller

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.282  Monday, 6 November 2017

 

From:        John F. Andrews <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         November 2, 2017 at 2:03:37 PM EDT

Subject:    Speaking of Shakespeare with WNET's Stephen Segaller

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Lecture: “Tremulous Hands: Tracing Diseases and Disorders in Medieval Handwriting”, TCD, 9 November, 1pm

Tremulous Hands: Tracing Diseases and Disorders in Medieval Handwriting

“Tremulous Hands: Tracing Diseases and Disorders in Medieval Handwriting”

Thursday, 9 November 2017, 1 – 2pm
Trinity Long Room Hub

Presented by Dr Deborah Thorpe Visiting Marie Sklodowska-­Curie Fellow,
Trinity Long Room Hub, with discussant Prof Brendan Kelly, Dept of
Psychiatry, TCD.

About Medical and Health Humanities

The Trinity College Dublin Medical and Health Humanities Initiative brings together researchers from a wide range of disciplines including history, philosophy, sociology, drama, health sciences, religion, cultural studies, arts, literature and languages.These events offer the opportunity to see medicine through the eyes of academics who are concerned with literary, historical, philosophical, aesthetic and technological perspectives of health, illness, disability and practice.

Campus Location: Trinity Long Room Hub
Accessibility: Yes
Room: Neill Lecture Theatre
Event Type: Alumni, Arts and Culture, Courses, Library, Public
Type of Event: One-time event
Audience: Undergrad, Postgrad, Alumni, Faculty & Staff, Public

Original author: Emily Y. O'Brien

Lecture: “Beyond the Book of Kells: Piers Plowman”, TCD, 7 November, 6.30pm

Beyond the Book of Kells: Piers Plowman

Beyond the Book of Kells: Piers Plowman

Tuesday, 7 November 2017, 6:30 – 8pm
Trinity College Long Room Hub

This lecture is part of a series entitled “Beyond the Book of Kells: The stories of eight other medieval manuscripts from the library of Trinity College Dublin.”

In this second talk of the series, Professor Simon Horobin from the University of Oxford will discuss TCD MS 212. This manuscript contains what is perhaps the great medieval English poem, William Langland’s Piers Plowman, an astonishingly rich and searching exploration of what it takes to live rightly in a society corrupt and corrupting. As befits a work of its quality, the poem survives in over fifty manuscripts; this, one of two in Trinity’s collection, is especially significant for containing early biographical information about the poet himself.

Further Information

To over 600,000 visitors a year, Trinity is synonymous with the Book of Kells. But that ninth-century manuscript is only part of the story. Ranging in date from the fifth century to the sixteenth, and with origins from across Western Europe, Trinity’s six hundred medieval manuscripts contain languages from Latin and Greek to Old Irish, Old English, Welsh, German, Dutch, Spanish, Italian, Provencal, and Vaudois. The texts embody in microcosm the entire gamut of medieval thought. This series of lectures from manuscript experts – Irish and international – will offer the public an opportunity to encounter eight other extraordinary books from Trinity’s collections, from the ninth-century Book of Armagh to a key manuscript of one of the great medieval English poets, William Langland.

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Before Mumsnet and What to Expect When You’re Expecting: Women’s Magazines as Sites of Information

The Perceptions of Pregnancy blog, like the Researchers’ Network, aims to reach beyond boundaries and borders, and to facilitate an international and interdisciplinary conversation on pregnancy and its associated bodily and emotional experiences from the earliest times to the present day. This week, network director Ciara Meehan looks at the dissemination of reproductive advice and information to women in 1960s Ireland.

Heidi Murkoff’s What to Expect When You’re Expecting is the biggest selling book for expectant mothers. First published in 1984, over eighteen million copies have since been sold, contributing to the book being named in 2007 by USA Today as one of the most influential books of the past twenty-five years. This household title is part of a well-established publishing tradition catering for pregnant women. As part of my current project on the everyday lives of women in 1960s Ireland, I’ve been researching the sources of information available to pregnant women, looking in particular at magazines and other prescriptive literature.

Despite the clear success of What to Expect When You’re Expecting, pregnant women are increasingly turning to the internet for further information, and there is a growth in the number of pregnancy-related websites. Surveys of usage in America, Italy, Sweden and China published between 2006 and 2013 show that between 72% and 95% of correspondents used the internet as a source of information on their pregnancy.[1] A separate survey conducted over a twelve-week period in 2010 of 613 users of British-based pregnancy sites found that the most frequent reasons women gave for searching the internet during their pregnancy was to find out information for themselves, to acquire supplemental information to that provided by healthcare professionals, to check specific symptoms, and to give themselves greater control over the decision-making process relating to their pregnancy.[2] The survey also asked women about additional sources and almost one-third of the participants sought information from magazines or newspapers.[3]

Womans Choice coverThe importance of magazines was even greater in the 1960s. Along with newspapers, they served as pre-digital sources of further information. Pregnancy manuals from that decade include Cross and Roden’s Preparing for your Baby and Erna Wright’s The New Childbirth. However, the reasons why women turned to magazines are strikingly similar to the reasons why women have logged on to the internet in the digital age.

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PhD student Stephanie Mawson wins Robert F. Heizer award

Stephanie Mawson, PhD student in the Faculty, has won the 2016 Robert F. Heizer Article Award for a paper published in Ethnohistory. The Heizer Prize was established in 1980 to honor Dr. Robert F. Heizer, ethnohistorian and archaeologist, noted for his research in California and Mesoamerica and is awarded in recognition of the best article in the field of ethnohistory. It is awarded by the American Society for Ethnohistory.

 

The article is: 'Philippine Indios in the Service of Empire: Indigenous Soldiers and Contingent Loyalty,' Ethnohistory, Vol. 63, No. 2 (2016), 381-413.

 

More details on Stephanie’s research: https://www.hist.cam.ac.uk/directory/stephanie-mawson

PhD student Stephanie Mawson wins Robert F. Heizer award

Stephanie Mawson, PhD student in the Faculty, has won the 2016 Robert F. Heizer Article Award for a paper published in Ethnohistory. The Heizer Prize was established in 1980 to honor Dr. Robert F. Heizer, ethnohistorian and archaeologist, noted for his research in California and Mesoamerica and is awarded in recognition of the best article in the field of ethnohistory. It is awarded by the American Society for Ethnohistory.

 

The article is: 'Philippine Indios in the Service of Empire: Indigenous Soldiers and Contingent Loyalty,' Ethnohistory, Vol. 63, No. 2 (2016), 381-413.

 

More details on Stephanie’s research: https://www.hist.cam.ac.uk/directory/stephanie-mawson

History undergraduates win History of Parliament and Gladstone Prizes

Congratulations to Jilna Shah and Fiona Garrrahan, who have won prizes with their Part II dissertations.

Jilna's dissertation, 'The Conservative Party and British Indians, 1975-90', has won the History of Parliament's annual Undergraduate Dissertation competition for the best undergraduate dissertation presented in 2017 on a subject relating to British or Irish parliamentary or political history before 1997.

It was judged by the History's Editorial Board and Editors, all distinguished historians, to have been a very impressive entry submitted in another competitive year for our award. They stated that the dissertation was a complex and sophisticated discussion of the issue and a genuinely original contribution to the field.

Fiona's dissertation 'The Making and Breaking of Trust during the British Savings Banks Scandals, 1848–1860' won the Gladstone Memorial Prize, awarded each year by the Gladstone Memorial Trust for the most meritorious Part II dissertation submitted by a candidate in the Faculty of Economics, Faculty of History and Department of Politics and International Studies.

History undergraduates win History of Parliament and Gladstone Prizes

Congratulations to Jilna Shah and Fiona Garrrahan, who have won prizes with their Part II dissertations.

Jilna's dissertation, 'The Conservative Party and British Indians, 1975-90', has won the History of Parliament's annual Undergraduate Dissertation competition for the best undergraduate dissertation presented in 2017 on a subject relating to British or Irish parliamentary or political history before 1997.

It was judged by the History's Editorial Board and Editors, all distinguished historians, to have been a very impressive entry submitted in another competitive year for our award. They stated that the dissertation was a complex and sophisticated discussion of the issue and a genuinely original contribution to the field.

Fiona's dissertation 'The Making and Breaking of Trust during the British Savings Banks Scandals, 1848–1860' won the Gladstone Memorial Prize, awarded each year by the Gladstone Memorial Trust for the most meritorious Part II dissertation submitted by a candidate in the Faculty of Economics, Faculty of History and Department of Politics and International Studies.

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