A YouTube channel for Faculty of History

The latest addition to the Faculty's windows to the world is a YouTube Channel  established by Graham Copekoga from the History and Policy group

Find it here

Included so far are videos on

The People of India: Anthropology and Visual Culture, 1800-1947

Men and Machines: The Industrial Revolution at Sea

...
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A YouTube channel for Faculty of History

The latest addition to the Faculty's windows to the world is a YouTube Channel  established by Graham Copekoga from the History and Policy group

Find it here

Included so far are videos on

James Stirling and the Faculty of History building

The People of India: Anthropology and Visual Culture, 1800-1947

...
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Protected: Amy Creighton

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Original author: clennphillips

Romanticism in the Dissecting Room

Courtesy of the National Library of Medicine

For centuries the need for the surgeon to learn more of the anatomy of the human body and to practice his art has required students of medicine to examine and dissect the bodies of the dead – obtained legally or otherwise – in private schools or, from the mid-eighteenth century, public hospitals. The work of Andreas Vesalius in Padua in the sixteenth century left a legacy of wonderful educational texts, beautifully illustrated.

For some, however, the horrors of the dissecting room disgusted and intrigued in equal measure, and the experience even now tests young stomachs.

In the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, when methods of preserving cadavers were basic and bodies often decomposing before they reached the dissecting room, it took great mental fortitude (and much dark humour) to sustain a man until the initial horror wore off and the identification of a body part with a living person ceased to terrify him. For many, however, that loss of a natural response to death was one that awakened in them the sense that they were about to lose something precious, which they resisted, and which persuaded them medicine was not for them.

Death Disease & Dissection: The life of a surgeon-apothecary 1750-1850 (published by Pen & Sword and available in a bundle with Maladies & Medicine) was inspired by knowledge that a number of doctors in training during this period were very creative young men and indeed this was seen as the age of ‘Romantic’ medicine in the same way that it is synonymous with the ‘Romantic’ arts. How did they cope and what did the men (and it was only men who were allowed to pursue this career path in this period) take from their training as inspiration for use in other fields?

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“The Winter’s Tale” at the Lir, Dublin

Performances at the Lir on Pearse Street, Dublin, from Friday 1st December until Thursday 7th December, at 7.30pm. Matinee: Monday 4th December, 1pm.
Tickets: €15 and €10 concession

The dark dramas of violent jealousy, sexual slander and death at the court of Sicilia, lead to a small baby girl being abandoned in the wild reaches of rural Bohemia. There, sixteen years later, the hot midsummer festivities are the background for delight, disguise and denunciation, which in turn carry the tale, replete with runaway lovers, a scalliwag, an old shepherd and his clown son back to Sicilia. The icy mourning of King Leontes begins to thaw as these two contrasting worlds meld, and in a magical finale full of revelations,  Shakespeare shows us his delight in such a vivid, motley collection of characters and his ultimate belief in forgiveness and redemption.

For more information on the production and to book tickets, see the Lir website here.

 

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Barbara Mowat

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.298  Monday, 27 November 2017

 

From:        Christa Jansohn <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         November 26, 2017 at 6:04:40 AM EST

Subject:    Barbara Mowat

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Deutschland hat Platz für Wisente

WWF-Studie untersucht Gebiete für Wiederansiedlung des Wisents

Wisent
Foto: Tobias Kümmerle

Deutschland hat ausreichend Platz für wildlebende Wisente. Das ist das Ergebnis einer vom WWF in Auftrag gegebenen Studie der Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, die die Naturschutzorganisation am Freitag veröffentlicht hat. Prof. Dr. Tobias Kümmerle und Benjamin Bleyhl vom Institut für Geographie haben darin zehn potentielle Gebiete für eine Wiederansiedelung des Wisents in Deutschland identifiziert. Besonders vielversprechend sind demnach der Müritz-Nationalpark mit der Mecklenburgischen Seenplatte, die Region Cottbus-Spreewald-Guben, der Harz und der Pfälzer Wald. Der Europäische Wisent ist der größte überlebende Pflanzenfresser in Europa und ein naher Verwandter des Amerikanischen Bisons.

„Unter ökologischen Gesichtspunkten gibt es in Deutschland genügend Platz für den Wisent“, sagt Dr. Diana Pretzell, die Leiterin des WWF-Naturschutzes für Deutschland. „Jetzt kommt es darauf an, ob die Bevölkerung in den potentiellen Wisent-Regionen sowie die Politik eine Rückkehr der einst ausgerotteten Wildrinder wollen. Dass eine Ansiedelung gelingen kann, zeigen andere Projekte in Mittel- und Osteuropa.“

Spreewald, Müritz, Harz oder Pfälzer Wald

Für Wiederansiedlungen kommen in Deutschland vor allem Lebensräume infrage, die dem Wisent genügend natürliche Rückzugsorte bieten. Faktoren wie die Entfernung des Gebietes zu Siedlungen und Straßen und die Beschaffenheit der Umgebung spielen dabei eine Rolle. Neben den vier bereits genannten Regionen finden sich laut WWF im gesamten Bundesgebiet noch weitere gut geeignete Wisent-Habitate. Dazu zählen die Mittelgebirge Schwarzwald, Spessart, Bayerischer und Thüringer Wald, sowie die deutschen Alpen und die Region rund um Celle/Hermannsburg.

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CFP: Borderlines XXII: Sickness, Strife, and Suffering at Queen’s University Belfast 2018

Call for papers for Borderlines XXII: Sickness, Strife, and Suffering. This conference will be held from 13-15th April 2018 at Queen’s University Belfast.

Proposals for both papers and panels are welcomed from postgraduate and postdoctoral researchers in the fields of both Medieval and Early Modern studies.

Sickness, strife and suffering punctuate many medieval and early-modern narratives. When viewed by the modern eye, however, these experiences can be difficult to comprehend and empathise with, without resorting to anachronisms. Indeed, in her landmark treatise on pain, Elaine Scarry contests that ‘[p]hysical pain does not simply resist language but actively destroys it’ (Scarry, 1985: 4), thus rendering any description or explanation of pain practically impossible, regardless of era.

In the light of Scarry’s work, the specific difficulties posed by the expression and understanding of pain in the Middle Ages have been expounded upon and theorised by numerous scholars. Esther Cohen’s work on the various symbolisms of medieval pain (Cohen, 2010), in addition to Robert Mills’ adumbration of translative pain theories, mapping the medieval experience of pain onto that of the current day and vice versa (Mills, 2005), are just two examples of scholarship exploring this fascinating area of research connecting the human experience of the present with that of the past.

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Peter Spufford, FSA, FRHistS, FBA (1934 - 2017)

It with sadness that I write with the news of the passing of Professor Peter Spufford, FSA, FBA, Professor Emeritus of European History, on Sunday 19 November.  Peter came to Cambridge and to Queens’ College in 1979 from the University of Keele.  During his years in the Faculty, he developed pioneering research on merchants, finance and exchange in late medieval Europe, upon which he drew for his enthusiastic supervision teaching and popular undergraduate papers on medieval and early renaissance Florence and other themes.  This culminated in a major study, Power and Profit: The Merchant in Medieval Europe (2002), since translated into a number of European languages.  After his retirement in 2001, he continued to write and to publish.  He was honoured earlier this year by the Royal Numismatic Society in the publication of a collection of essays to celebrate the 30-year anniversary of his ground-breaking Money and its Use in Medieval Europe (1988).  This is a reflection of breadth of his impact as a scholar and teacher, and a colleague who will be greatly missed.

Details of the funeral are given below at the request of Peter's family.

Chair, Faculty of History

 


Dear Family & Friends,

...
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Peter Spufford, FSA, FRHistS, FBA (1934 - 2017)

It with sadness that I write with the news of the passing of Professor Peter Spufford, FSA, FBA, Professor Emeritus of European History, on Sunday 19 November.  Peter came to Cambridge and to Queens’ College in 1979 from the University of Keele.  During his years in the Faculty, he developed pioneering research on merchants, finance and exchange in late medieval Europe, upon which he drew for his enthusiastic supervision teaching and popular undergraduate papers on medieval and early renaissance Florence and other themes.  This culminated in a major study, Power and Profit: The Merchant in Medieval Europe (2002), since translated into a number of European languages.  After his retirement in 2001, he continued to write and to publish.  He was honoured earlier this year by the Royal Numismatic Society in the publication of a collection of essays to celebrate the 30-year anniversary of his ground-breaking Money and its Use in Medieval Europe (1988).  This is a reflection of breadth of his impact as a scholar and teacher, and a colleague who will be greatly missed.

Details of the funeral are given below at the request of Peter's family.

Chair, Faculty of History

 


Dear Family & Friends,

...
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Radical Mischief: A Conference Inviting Experiment in Theatre, Thought and Politics

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.294  Tuesday, 21 November 2017

 

From:        Hardy Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Date:         November 19, 2017 at 11:23:47 AM EST

Subject:    Radical Mischief: A Conference Inviting Experiment in Theatre, Thought and Politics

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Maitland PhD Studentship in Legal History available, commencing October 2018

The Managers of the F.W. Maitland Memorial Fund are able to offer one Studentship for Home/EU, or Overseas/Islands students applying to undertake doctoral research in legal history at the University of Cambridge, starting in October 2018. Studentships are tenable in the Faculty of Law, the Faculty of History, or the Faculty of English.

For further details, visit:

https://www.law.cam.ac.uk/coursesprospective-studentspostgraduate-research/funding

Maitland PhD Studentship in Legal History available, commencing October 2018

The Managers of the F.W. Maitland Memorial Fund are able to offer one Studentship for Home/EU, or Overseas/Islands students applying to undertake doctoral research in legal history at the University of Cambridge, starting in October 2018. Studentships are tenable in the Faculty of Law, the Faculty of History, or the Faculty of English.

For further details, visit:

https://www.law.cam.ac.uk/coursesprospective-studentspostgraduate-research/funding

Secondary Education and Social Change project launches its new website

The website for a major new ESRC research project based in the History Faculty, 'Secondary Education and Social Change in the United Kingdom since 1945', has now launched. The site includes a blog with up to date news relating to the project, an interactive timeline, and downloadable resources. You can browse the site here: https://sesc.hist.cam.ac.uk.

Secondary Education and Social Change project launches its new website

The website for a major new ESRC research project based in the History Faculty, 'Secondary Education and Social Change in the United Kingdom since 1945', has now launched. The site includes a blog with up to date news relating to the project, an interactive timeline, and downloadable resources. You can browse the site here: https://sesc.hist.cam.ac.uk.

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