Anglo-Saxon Literary Landscapes

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Original author: Estes

World Building. Transmedia, Fans, Industries

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Original author: Boni

Modern Ghost Melodramas

490 pages | 48 color plates | 6 x 9

Cloth $155.00 ISBN: 9789462980167 Published December 2017 For sale only in the United States, its dependencies, the Philippines, and Canada

The popular and critical successes of films like The Sixth Sense and TheRing in the late 1990s led to an impressive international explosion of scary films dealing with ghosts. This book takes a close look at a number of those films from different countries, including the United States, Japan, South Korea, Spain, and Great Britain. Making a crucial distinction between these atmospheric films and conventional horror, Michael Walker argues that they are most productively seen as ghost melodramas, which opens them up to a powerful range of analytic tools from the study of melodrama, including, crucially, psychoanalysis.

Original author: Walker

Premodern Rulership and Contemporary Political Power

448 pages | 5 color plates, 4 halftones, 1 line drawing | 6 x 9

Cloth $130.00 ISBN: 9789462983311 Published December 2017 For sale only in the United States, its dependencies, the Philippines, and Canada

In the medieval period, the monarch was seen as the embodiment of the community of his kingdom, the body politic. And while we've long since shed that view, it nonetheless continues to influence our understanding of contemporary politics. This book offers thirteen case studies from premodern and contemporary Europe that demonstrate the process through which political corporations—bodies politic—were and continue to be constructed and challenged. Drawing on  history, archaeology, literary criticism, and art history, the contributors survey a wide geographical and chronological spectrum to offer a panoramic view of these dynamic political entities.
 

Original author: Mroziewicz;

Migrant Penalties in Educational Achievement

210 pages | 84 halftones | 6 x 9

Cloth $115.00 ISBN: 9789462981348 Published December 2017 For sale only in the United States, its dependencies, the Philippines, and Canada

The integration of second-generation immigrants has proved to be a major challenge for Europe in recent years. Though these people are born in their host nations, they often experience worse social and economic outcomes than other citizens. This volume focuses on one particular, important challenge: the less successful educational outcomes of second-generation migrants. Looking at data from seventeen European nations, Camilla Borgna shows that migrant penalties in educational achievement exist in each one—but that, unexpectedly, the penalties tend to be greater in countries in which socioeconomic inequalities in education are generally more modest, a finding that should prompt reconsideration of a number of policy approaches.

Original author: Borgna

Conversations with Christian Metz

320 pages | 6 x 9 | © 2018

Paper $49.95 ISBN: 9789089648259 Published December 2017 For sale only in the United States, its dependencies, the Philippines, and Canada

This book translates a series of colloquial but in-depth interviews with a seminal film theorist, Christian Metz, in which he explains and expands on his groundbreaking theories. These interviews have never before been available in English, and they serve as an accessible introduction to film theory from one of its pioneers. The interviewers act as curious readers as they question Metz, who discusses his key tenets and the social landscape of his time, and offers unusual insights into his work.
 

Original author: Buckland;

Understanding Culture

Monika Baár, Professor in Cultural History and the History of Political Thought at the University of Leiden, the Netherlands

“This much-needed and very welcome textbook excels at the challenging task of conveying the intricacies of theory in a crisp and accessible manner to the reader. Abundant in illuminating examples, it is a guide to culture in the best sense of the world: it provides a lasting inspiration for reflection (well after it has been read).” 

Original author: Hellemans

Symposium: New directions in early modern Irish women’s history

This one-day interdisciplinary symposium, presented by the Women’s History Association of Ireland, will be held at the Moore Institute in NUI Galway on Friday 16th February 2018.

This will bring together leading and emerging scholars from a variety of disciplines currently engaged in cutting-edge research on the history of early modern Irish women. Keynote lectures will be delivered by Professor Mary O’Dowd (QUB) and Professor Jane Ohlmeyer (TCD). Other confirmed speakers include Sparky Booker (QUB), Felicity Maxwell (NUIG), Frances Nolan (UCD), Clodagh Tait (MI), Evan Bourke (NUIG) and Jane Maxwell (TCD). The symposium is free to attend, but advance registration is necessary.

For further details, contact the organiser Dr Bronagh McShane at: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

For more on the Women’s History Association of Ireland, see the WHAI blog here.

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A Christmas Tragedy with a Miraculous Ending

Every year we aim to bring you a Christmas themed post. We have looked at Christmas Roses, Mince pies, and soon will be bringing you a suggestion for warding off Christmas over-indulgence. Today we bring you a story related to Christmas, although perhaps not one that embodies Christmas spirit.

This tale began in Christmas 1671 –  not a happy one for Francis Culham and his family for quite suddenly he was stuck down with a ‘distemper’ which left him paralysed and ‘insensible’. Culham worked as a chirurgeon and had a good reputation both at sea and at home. He was living in the White Lion in South Lambeth.

It seems that Culham had begun having falls from August 1671 and suffered some concussion and humours flowing into his brain, which left him feeling quite melancholic. In what must have been a terrifying experience, and having just marked his 40th birthday since he was born on Christmas Day, 1631,  Culham seems to have felt a creeping paralysis overcoming his body. He was soon paralysed and spent the first month in bed unable to take food save for a sip of syrup some mornings. At the end of the month he seemed to rally a little and could sometimes enjoy a good meal, before lapsing into his distemper again, during which time he would make awful howling noises. When he could eat, he did so ravenously and tore at his meat, and drank up to seven quarts of strong drink. When in the distemper he couldn’t recognise his wife or children, nor any of his many visitors but neither would he suffer himself being treated with any ‘internal’ medicine.

This situation continued for several years until the spring of 1676 when the patient was twice let blood (which the author of this accounts, says may or may not be significant in Culham’s recovery). On Friday 12th May 1676, at around 10 in the morning, Culham signaled for a pen and some paper and proceeded to write out a prayer which began:

Lord grant a Power from thy divine Nature.

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Dr Andrew Arsan wins a 2017 Philip Leverhulme Prize.

The Leverhulme Trust has announced the winners of the 2017 Philip Leverhulme Prizes. Dr Arsan is one of five Cambridge researchers among this year's winners

Philip Leverhulme Prizes have been awarded annually since 2001 in commemoration of the contribution to the work of the Trust made by Philip Leverhulme, the Third Viscount Leverhulme and grandson of William Hesketh Lever, the founder of the Trust. The prizes recognise the achievement of outstanding researchers whose work has already attracted international recognition and whose future career is exceptionally promising. 

In 2017 the Trust offered five prizes in each of the following subject areas: Biological Sciences; History; Law; Mathematics and Statistics; Philosophy and Theology; Sociology and Social Policy.

Each of the 30 Prize Winners receives £100,000 which can be used over two or three years to advance their research.

In 2018 the Trust will invite nominations for prizes in: Classics; Earth Sciences; Physics; Politics and International Relations; Psychology; Visual and Performing Arts.

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The British Academy awards a Fellowship to Dr Yuliya Hilevych for project on social history of infertility in Britain

The British Academy has awarded a two-year Newton International Fellowship to Dr Yuliya Hilevych to undertake a project on social history of infertility in Britain

 

In January 2018, Yuliya Hilevych is starting as a Newton International Fellow of the British Academy at the Faculty of History on a project to study the social history of infertility in Britain. She will work with Prof Simon Szreter.

 

Yuliya Hilevych holds a PhD (2016) from Wageningen University, a joint degree with Radboud University, in the Netherlands. Previously, she held research positions at Radboud University and the Netherlands Interdisciplinary Demographic Institute (NIDI), and participated in research projects for the United Nations and the Dutch Ministry of Justice and Security.

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2018 IJBS Regional Day Conference

REMEMBRANCE AND RE-APPROPRIATION: SHAPING DISSENTING IDENTITIES

A Regional Day Conference of the International John Bunyan Society, organized in association with the University of Bedfordshire, Keele University, and Northumbria University.

Keele University, Staffordshire, Friday 13 April 2018
CALL FOR PAPERS

The purpose of this interdisciplinary conference is to explore seventeenth- and long-eighteenth-century practices of memorialisation and re-appropriation and the ways in which these might be put to work in shaping various dissenting identities. Papers may focus on, for example, the remembrance or re-appropriation of rituals or practices, experiences of persecution, anniversaries, memories, and events (personal or public); conservative vs subversive practices of memorialisation/re-appropriation; the collection and/or re-appropriation of particular texts, authors, or genres (devotional writing, history, biography); the contexts and/or methods for memorialisation/re-appropriation; the use of memorialisation/re-appropriation in the formation and survival of particular dissenting communities. Please send a title and brief (200-word) summary of a 20-minute paper – no later than 1 February 2018 – to: Rachel Adcock (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.), Bob Owens (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.), and David Walker (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.).

PLENARY SPEAKERS
Professor John Coffey (University of Leicester) – ‘Rewriting the History of Dissent’
Dr Johanna Harris (University of Exeter) – Title tba

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Women's suffrage poster collection to go on display at the University Library

With over 15 posters, from A3 to giant publicity posters, the collection, which has recently been rediscovered, includes some of the most important artwork of the women’s suffrage movement.

800px Handicapped! Women's suffrage poster, 1910sIn 2016, Emily Dourish, Deputy Head of Rare Books, opened the private world of the Cambridge University Library stacks to historians Lucy Delap and Ben Griffin, to see a women’s suffrage poster collection that has been recently rediscovered after being filed away in the tower for over a century. With over 15 posters, from A3 to giant publicity posters, the collection includes some of the most important artwork of the women’s suffrage movement. It includes works produced by the Suffrage Atelier, founded in 1909 as ‘an arts and crafts society working for the enfranchisement of women’, and others from the Artists’ Suffrage League, which worked to support the National Union of Women’s Suffrage Societies from 1907. Some of the posters were hand-tinted in colour, and this may have been done locally by student supporters of women’s suffrage. Some posters were for national use; others must have been taken from the Cambridge campaign, and invited local law-abiding women and men to ‘come and sign the voters’ petition’, at St Luke’s School, Victoria Road. The posters will be amongst the topics at a conference to celebrate the centenary of the partial enfranchisement of women in 1918, to be held 3 Feb 2018 at Murray Edwards College.

Why did the University Library hold these posters? When bringing them up for a first look, the discovery of the postal wrapper which had been used for at least some of the posters was crucial evidence. They had been sent by Dr Marion Phillips, secretary of the Women’s Labour League – the women’s section of the early Labour Party. Marion Phillips was also a prominent suffrage supporter within the National Union of Women’s Suffrage Societies, and went on to become MP for Sunderland in 1929. Why she sent the posters to the University Library remains a mystery – they were simply addressed to ‘The Librarian’, and no covering letter has survived. But their presence allows us to understand better the kind of rich visual resources that were so important to the women’s suffrage campaign, and to see some previously unknown designs.

The posters will be on display at the University Library from Feb 3rd 2018. Suffrage scholar Elizabeth Crawford will give a public lecture on posters and suffrage at 6.30pm on the opening night of the exhibition, to which all are warmly invited:

http://www.lib.cam.ac.uk/plan-your-visit/whats/pictures-and-politics-art-suffrage-propaganda

Women's suffrage poster collection to on display at the University Library

800px Handicapped! Women's suffrage poster, 1910sIn 2016, Emily Dourish, Deputy Head of Rare Books, opened the private world of the Cambridge University Library stacks to historians Lucy Delap and Ben Griffin, to see a women’s suffrage poster collection that has been recently rediscovered after being filed away in the tower for over a century. With over 15 posters, from A3 to giant publicity posters, the collection includes some of the most important artwork of the women’s suffrage movement. It includes works produced by the Suffrage Atelier, founded in 1909 as ‘an arts and crafts society working for the enfranchisement of women’, and others from the Artists’ Suffrage League, which worked to support the National Union of Women’s Suffrage Societies from 1907. Some of the posters were hand-tinted in colour, and this may have been done locally by student supporters of women’s suffrage. Some posters were for national use; others must have been taken from the Cambridge campaign, and invited local law-abiding women and men to ‘come and sign the voters’ petition’, at St Luke’s School, Victoria Road. The posters will be amongst the topics at a conference to celebrate the centenary of the partial enfranchisement of women in 1918, to be held 3 Feb 2018 at Murray Edwards College. [insert link https://www.hist.cam.ac.uk/research/conferences/women2019s-suffrage-and-political-activism]

Why did the University Library hold these posters? When bringing them up for a first look, the discovery of the postal wrapper which had been used for at least some of the posters was crucial evidence. They had been sent by Dr Marion Phillips, secretary of the Women’s Labour League – the women’s section of the early Labour Party. Marion Phillips was also a prominent suffrage supporter within the National Union of Women’s Suffrage Societies, and went on to become MP for Sunderland in 1929. Why she sent the posters to the University Library remains a mystery – they were simply addressed to ‘The Librarian’, and no covering letter has survived. But their presence allows us to understand better the kind of rich visual resources that were so important to the women’s suffrage campaign, and to see some previously unknown designs. The posters will be on display at the University Library from Feb 3rd 2018. Suffrage scholar Elizabeth Crawford will give a public lecture on posters and suffrage at 6.30pm on the opening night of the exhibition, to which all are warmly invited: http://www.lib.cam.ac.uk/plan-your-visit/whats/pictures-and-politics-art-suffrage-propaganda

Fashioning the Early Modern Courtier

© Society for Renaissance Studies 2018

Original author: RWillie
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A YouTube channel for Faculty of History

The latest addition to the Faculty's windows to the world is a YouTube Channel  established by Graham Copekoga from the History and Policy group

Find it here

Included so far are videos on

The People of India: Anthropology and Visual Culture, 1800-1947

Men and Machines: The Industrial Revolution at Sea

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A YouTube channel for Faculty of History

The latest addition to the Faculty's windows to the world is a YouTube Channel  established by Graham Copekoga from the History and Policy group

Find it here

Included so far are videos on

James Stirling and the Faculty of History building

The People of India: Anthropology and Visual Culture, 1800-1947

...
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Protected: Amy Creighton

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Original author: clennphillips

Romanticism in the Dissecting Room

Courtesy of the National Library of Medicine

For centuries the need for the surgeon to learn more of the anatomy of the human body and to practice his art has required students of medicine to examine and dissect the bodies of the dead – obtained legally or otherwise – in private schools or, from the mid-eighteenth century, public hospitals. The work of Andreas Vesalius in Padua in the sixteenth century left a legacy of wonderful educational texts, beautifully illustrated.

For some, however, the horrors of the dissecting room disgusted and intrigued in equal measure, and the experience even now tests young stomachs.

In the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, when methods of preserving cadavers were basic and bodies often decomposing before they reached the dissecting room, it took great mental fortitude (and much dark humour) to sustain a man until the initial horror wore off and the identification of a body part with a living person ceased to terrify him. For many, however, that loss of a natural response to death was one that awakened in them the sense that they were about to lose something precious, which they resisted, and which persuaded them medicine was not for them.

Death Disease & Dissection: The life of a surgeon-apothecary 1750-1850 (published by Pen & Sword and available in a bundle with Maladies & Medicine) was inspired by knowledge that a number of doctors in training during this period were very creative young men and indeed this was seen as the age of ‘Romantic’ medicine in the same way that it is synonymous with the ‘Romantic’ arts. How did they cope and what did the men (and it was only men who were allowed to pursue this career path in this period) take from their training as inspiration for use in other fields?

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“The Winter’s Tale” at the Lir, Dublin

Performances at the Lir on Pearse Street, Dublin, from Friday 1st December until Thursday 7th December, at 7.30pm. Matinee: Monday 4th December, 1pm.
Tickets: €15 and €10 concession

The dark dramas of violent jealousy, sexual slander and death at the court of Sicilia, lead to a small baby girl being abandoned in the wild reaches of rural Bohemia. There, sixteen years later, the hot midsummer festivities are the background for delight, disguise and denunciation, which in turn carry the tale, replete with runaway lovers, a scalliwag, an old shepherd and his clown son back to Sicilia. The icy mourning of King Leontes begins to thaw as these two contrasting worlds meld, and in a magical finale full of revelations,  Shakespeare shows us his delight in such a vivid, motley collection of characters and his ultimate belief in forgiveness and redemption.

For more information on the production and to book tickets, see the Lir website here.

 

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