Vient de paraître : Les émotions positives et leurs représentations en Grèce archaïque

EMMA (Les Émotions au Moyen Âge) est un programme de recherche qui se consacre depuis 2006 à l’étude des émotions médiévales dans une perspective d’échanges avec les sciences humaines et sociales.
Il est animé par Damien BOQUET (Université d'Aix-Marseille) et Piroska NAGY (Université du Québec à Montréal)

Le carnet d'EMMA présente l'actualité des recherches autour des émotions médiévales.
Les rubriques du menu donnent accès à un certain nombre d'archives sur les travaux déjà produits (programmes des rencontres EMMA, publications) et annoncent les chantiers à venir.

Original author: Damien Boquet

Early Theatre 20.2

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.323  Thursday, 21 December 2017

 

From:        Helen M Ostovich

Date:         December 20, 2017 at 3:23:08 PM EST

Subject:    Early Theatre 20.2

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Winning Authors in Early Theatre

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 28.322  Thursday, 21 December 2017

 

From:        Helen M Ostovich

Date:         December 20, 2017 at 3:15:40 PM EST

Subject:    Winning Authors in Early Theatre

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Thank you to Ciara

As we come to the end of 2017, we thought we would take a moment to thank Ciara Meehan – co-founder and co-director – of the network, who has decided to step down from her role. We wish her all the best with her future endeavours and hope to welcome her back to the committee in the future. Ciara has written several fantastic blogs for the network since it began. So to say farewell here are some of the topics she has fascinated us with.

‘It was quite shocking’: The Day the Government Leader Voted Against his Government’s Legislation on Contraception

Before Mumsnet and What to Expect When You’re Expecting: Women’s Magazines as Sites of Information

 

‘Am I Pregnant?’: Women’s Magazines as a Source of Information


Original author: jennifercevans

Under the Mistletoe

Wellcome Library. Kathryn Ball, watercolour of sprig of leaves and berries.

Christmas is drawing ever closer and people are decorating their homes, soon, I’m sure, we will start to see sprigs of mistletoe hanging from door frames. We all know that two people under the mistletoe are supposed to kiss. But in the early modern period mistletoe (or misletow, misletoe) was also thought to be a useful medicinal plant.

In 1730 John Colbatch published an entire Dissertation Concerning Misletoe describing it as ‘a Wonderful Specifick Remedy for the Cure of Convulsive Distempers’.1 As he explained in the introduction

It would be highly criminal in me to let another Misletoe Season pass, without informing the World what a Treasure God Almighty has every Year presented to their View; and that nobody, at least very few, have received any Benefit from it

He explained that the Bills of Mortality (printed lists showing what people had died of in London) revealed that convulsions caused a fifth of all deaths, mostly in children. Thus it was imperative that everyone was informed about this ‘Wonderful’ medicine that offered hope to parents.

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New video about James Stirling and the Faculty of History

Completed in 1967 and opened in 1968, the History Faculty building by Sir James Stirling was one of the most controversial buildings in Cambridge and one that was nearly razed to the ground in the 1980s. Fifty years since its completion, the building is now Grade 2 listed and seen by many as a masterpiece of post-war architecture by one of Britains leading architects; Sir James Stirling. This video looks at the moment leading up to the building of the History Faculty and the work of Sir James Stirling. Lord Richard Rogers talks about Stirling’s work at Cambridge and the influence it had on his generation of architects.

New video about James Stirling and the Faculty of History

Completed in 1967 and opened in 1968, the History Faculty building by Sir James Stirling was one of the most controversial buildings in Cambridge and one that was nearly razed to the ground in the 1980s. Fifty years since its completion, the building is now Grade 2 listed and seen by many as a masterpiece of post-war architecture by one of Britains leading architects; Sir James Stirling. This video looks at the moment leading up to the building of the History Faculty and the work of Sir James Stirling. Lord Richard Rogers talks about Stirling’s work at Cambridge and the influence it had on his generation of architects.

Religion and Nationalism in Chinese Societies

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Original author: Kuo

Anglo-Saxon Literary Landscapes

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Original author: Estes

World Building. Transmedia, Fans, Industries

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Original author: Boni

Modern Ghost Melodramas

490 pages | 48 color plates | 6 x 9

Cloth $155.00 ISBN: 9789462980167 Published December 2017 For sale only in the United States, its dependencies, the Philippines, and Canada

The popular and critical successes of films like The Sixth Sense and TheRing in the late 1990s led to an impressive international explosion of scary films dealing with ghosts. This book takes a close look at a number of those films from different countries, including the United States, Japan, South Korea, Spain, and Great Britain. Making a crucial distinction between these atmospheric films and conventional horror, Michael Walker argues that they are most productively seen as ghost melodramas, which opens them up to a powerful range of analytic tools from the study of melodrama, including, crucially, psychoanalysis.

Original author: Walker

Premodern Rulership and Contemporary Political Power

448 pages | 5 color plates, 4 halftones, 1 line drawing | 6 x 9

Cloth $130.00 ISBN: 9789462983311 Published December 2017 For sale only in the United States, its dependencies, the Philippines, and Canada

In the medieval period, the monarch was seen as the embodiment of the community of his kingdom, the body politic. And while we've long since shed that view, it nonetheless continues to influence our understanding of contemporary politics. This book offers thirteen case studies from premodern and contemporary Europe that demonstrate the process through which political corporations—bodies politic—were and continue to be constructed and challenged. Drawing on  history, archaeology, literary criticism, and art history, the contributors survey a wide geographical and chronological spectrum to offer a panoramic view of these dynamic political entities.
 

Original author: Mroziewicz;

Migrant Penalties in Educational Achievement

210 pages | 84 halftones | 6 x 9

Cloth $115.00 ISBN: 9789462981348 Published December 2017 For sale only in the United States, its dependencies, the Philippines, and Canada

The integration of second-generation immigrants has proved to be a major challenge for Europe in recent years. Though these people are born in their host nations, they often experience worse social and economic outcomes than other citizens. This volume focuses on one particular, important challenge: the less successful educational outcomes of second-generation migrants. Looking at data from seventeen European nations, Camilla Borgna shows that migrant penalties in educational achievement exist in each one—but that, unexpectedly, the penalties tend to be greater in countries in which socioeconomic inequalities in education are generally more modest, a finding that should prompt reconsideration of a number of policy approaches.

Original author: Borgna

Conversations with Christian Metz

320 pages | 6 x 9 | © 2018

Paper $49.95 ISBN: 9789089648259 Published December 2017 For sale only in the United States, its dependencies, the Philippines, and Canada

This book translates a series of colloquial but in-depth interviews with a seminal film theorist, Christian Metz, in which he explains and expands on his groundbreaking theories. These interviews have never before been available in English, and they serve as an accessible introduction to film theory from one of its pioneers. The interviewers act as curious readers as they question Metz, who discusses his key tenets and the social landscape of his time, and offers unusual insights into his work.
 

Original author: Buckland;

Understanding Culture

Monika Baár, Professor in Cultural History and the History of Political Thought at the University of Leiden, the Netherlands

“This much-needed and very welcome textbook excels at the challenging task of conveying the intricacies of theory in a crisp and accessible manner to the reader. Abundant in illuminating examples, it is a guide to culture in the best sense of the world: it provides a lasting inspiration for reflection (well after it has been read).” 

Original author: Hellemans

Symposium: New directions in early modern Irish women’s history

This one-day interdisciplinary symposium, presented by the Women’s History Association of Ireland, will be held at the Moore Institute in NUI Galway on Friday 16th February 2018.

This will bring together leading and emerging scholars from a variety of disciplines currently engaged in cutting-edge research on the history of early modern Irish women. Keynote lectures will be delivered by Professor Mary O’Dowd (QUB) and Professor Jane Ohlmeyer (TCD). Other confirmed speakers include Sparky Booker (QUB), Felicity Maxwell (NUIG), Frances Nolan (UCD), Clodagh Tait (MI), Evan Bourke (NUIG) and Jane Maxwell (TCD). The symposium is free to attend, but advance registration is necessary.

For further details, contact the organiser Dr Bronagh McShane at: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

For more on the Women’s History Association of Ireland, see the WHAI blog here.

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A Christmas Tragedy with a Miraculous Ending

Every year we aim to bring you a Christmas themed post. We have looked at Christmas Roses, Mince pies, and soon will be bringing you a suggestion for warding off Christmas over-indulgence. Today we bring you a story related to Christmas, although perhaps not one that embodies Christmas spirit.

This tale began in Christmas 1671 –  not a happy one for Francis Culham and his family for quite suddenly he was stuck down with a ‘distemper’ which left him paralysed and ‘insensible’. Culham worked as a chirurgeon and had a good reputation both at sea and at home. He was living in the White Lion in South Lambeth.

It seems that Culham had begun having falls from August 1671 and suffered some concussion and humours flowing into his brain, which left him feeling quite melancholic. In what must have been a terrifying experience, and having just marked his 40th birthday since he was born on Christmas Day, 1631,  Culham seems to have felt a creeping paralysis overcoming his body. He was soon paralysed and spent the first month in bed unable to take food save for a sip of syrup some mornings. At the end of the month he seemed to rally a little and could sometimes enjoy a good meal, before lapsing into his distemper again, during which time he would make awful howling noises. When he could eat, he did so ravenously and tore at his meat, and drank up to seven quarts of strong drink. When in the distemper he couldn’t recognise his wife or children, nor any of his many visitors but neither would he suffer himself being treated with any ‘internal’ medicine.

This situation continued for several years until the spring of 1676 when the patient was twice let blood (which the author of this accounts, says may or may not be significant in Culham’s recovery). On Friday 12th May 1676, at around 10 in the morning, Culham signaled for a pen and some paper and proceeded to write out a prayer which began:

Lord grant a Power from thy divine Nature.

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Dr Andrew Arsan wins a 2017 Philip Leverhulme Prize.

The Leverhulme Trust has announced the winners of the 2017 Philip Leverhulme Prizes. Dr Arsan is one of five Cambridge researchers among this year's winners

Philip Leverhulme Prizes have been awarded annually since 2001 in commemoration of the contribution to the work of the Trust made by Philip Leverhulme, the Third Viscount Leverhulme and grandson of William Hesketh Lever, the founder of the Trust. The prizes recognise the achievement of outstanding researchers whose work has already attracted international recognition and whose future career is exceptionally promising. 

In 2017 the Trust offered five prizes in each of the following subject areas: Biological Sciences; History; Law; Mathematics and Statistics; Philosophy and Theology; Sociology and Social Policy.

Each of the 30 Prize Winners receives £100,000 which can be used over two or three years to advance their research.

In 2018 the Trust will invite nominations for prizes in: Classics; Earth Sciences; Physics; Politics and International Relations; Psychology; Visual and Performing Arts.

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The British Academy awards a Fellowship to Dr Yuliya Hilevych for project on social history of infertility in Britain

The British Academy has awarded a two-year Newton International Fellowship to Dr Yuliya Hilevych to undertake a project on social history of infertility in Britain

 

In January 2018, Yuliya Hilevych is starting as a Newton International Fellow of the British Academy at the Faculty of History on a project to study the social history of infertility in Britain. She will work with Prof Simon Szreter.

 

Yuliya Hilevych holds a PhD (2016) from Wageningen University, a joint degree with Radboud University, in the Netherlands. Previously, she held research positions at Radboud University and the Netherlands Interdisciplinary Demographic Institute (NIDI), and participated in research projects for the United Nations and the Dutch Ministry of Justice and Security.

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2018 IJBS Regional Day Conference

REMEMBRANCE AND RE-APPROPRIATION: SHAPING DISSENTING IDENTITIES

A Regional Day Conference of the International John Bunyan Society, organized in association with the University of Bedfordshire, Keele University, and Northumbria University.

Keele University, Staffordshire, Friday 13 April 2018
CALL FOR PAPERS

The purpose of this interdisciplinary conference is to explore seventeenth- and long-eighteenth-century practices of memorialisation and re-appropriation and the ways in which these might be put to work in shaping various dissenting identities. Papers may focus on, for example, the remembrance or re-appropriation of rituals or practices, experiences of persecution, anniversaries, memories, and events (personal or public); conservative vs subversive practices of memorialisation/re-appropriation; the collection and/or re-appropriation of particular texts, authors, or genres (devotional writing, history, biography); the contexts and/or methods for memorialisation/re-appropriation; the use of memorialisation/re-appropriation in the formation and survival of particular dissenting communities. Please send a title and brief (200-word) summary of a 20-minute paper – no later than 1 February 2018 – to: Rachel Adcock (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.), Bob Owens (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.), and David Walker (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.).

PLENARY SPEAKERS
Professor John Coffey (University of Leicester) – ‘Rewriting the History of Dissent’
Dr Johanna Harris (University of Exeter) – Title tba

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