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Anne Dunan-Page is Professor of Early Modern British Studies at Aix-Marseille University, Fellow of the Institut Universitaire de France, and Associate Director of the Research Centre on the English-Speaking World (LERMA, E.A 853), where she co-directs the Seminar on Early-Modern Britain.

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Antoinette Gimaret is Maître de Conférences of French Seventeenth-century literature at the Faculty of Literature and Human Sciences, University of Limoges (France).

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Ariel Hessayon is Senior Lecturer in the Department of History at Goldsmiths, University of London.  He is the author of 'Gold tried in the fire’.  The prophet TheaurauJohn Tany and the English Revolution (Ashgate, 2007) as well as lead editor of collections of essays on Biblical scholarship, English radicalism and the reception of the German Lutheran mystic Jacob Boehme's writings. 

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Audrey Duru is Maître de conférences of French literature of Sixteenth-century, at the Faculty of Literature, University of Picardie-Jules Verne, chemin du Thil, 80 000 Amiens, France.

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I was born in Israel in 1968 and lived there until I moved to Denmark in 1997 to live with my Danish girlfriend (now wife).

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Bernard Cooperman, University of Maryland, Early Modern Jewish History

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Catie Gill was appointed as ‘Lecturer in Early Modern Writing’ in 2007, though she first came to Loughborough years earlier as a PhD student to work with Professor Elaine Hobby on a project about Women’s Autobiographical Writings.

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Chiara Petrolini studied history of philosophy at the Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa, and at the Istituto Nazionale di Studi sul Rinascimento (Palazzo Strozzi, Florence) and currently has a research contract (1 year) with the University of Verona. Her main research interest focus on early modern philosophy, the history of historiography, heterodoxy and political thought, with special attention to Paolo Sarpi and to the relationship between Italy and England. 

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Cristiana Facchini is Associate Professor at the Alma Mater Studiorum – University of Bologna, School of Humanities and Cultural Heritage. She works at the Department of History, Culture, Civilizations, where she is also the coordinator of the MA Program in Cultural Anthropology and Ethnology. 

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Frances Courtney Kneupper is visiting assistant professor of European History at the University of Mississippi. She received her PhD from Northwestern in 2011. Her research interests include religious and cultural history of the Late Middle Ages, with a special focus on heresy, prophecy, and religious dissent. Her current project is titled Crafting Religious and National Identity: The Use of Prophecy in Late Medieval Germany. In 2008, she received a Fulbright Grant for her research in German manuscript libraries. Her minor field is Medieval Islam.

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Cyril Selzner is currently teaching philosophy (classes préparatoires, lycée Gay-Lussac in Limoges) and British studies at the University of Limoges (France). Curriculum: agrégation in philosophy, PhD in philosophy from the University of Paris I (Panthéon-Sorbonne), former student of the École normale supérieure (Paris) and of Princeton University.

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Damaris Gehr, Istituto Svizzero di Roma 

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Daniela Solfaroli Camillocci, Université de Genève, Institut d'histoire de la Réformation

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Dennj Solera is a PhD student in History at the University of Florence, with History of Counter-Reformation as previous main field. From November 2014 he is working on his dissertation, preliminarily titled “The familiares of the roman Holy Office. A political and social profile of the Inquisition’s police”.

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Diego Pirillo (PhD., Scuola Normale Superiore) is Assistant Professor of Italian Studies at the University of California, Berkeley, having previously taught at the Scuola Normale Superiore and at the University of Pisa. He has held fellowships and grants at various institutions (including the Houghton Library at Harvard University, the John Carter Brown Library at Brown University, the Newberry Library, the Renaissance Society of America, and the Institute of International Studies at UC Berkeley).

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Elisabeth Fischer is a doctoral candidate in history at Humboldt University in Berlin.

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Elisabetta Lurgo was awarded a PhD in History at the University of Piemonte Orientale in 2010, with a thesis about the Dominican prophetess and visionary Catherine of Racconigi. She currently is a Research Fellow at the Compagnia di San Paolo – Fondazione 1563 in Turin and she’s working as research adjunct with the University of Padova.

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İlker Evrim Binbaş is lecturer in Early Modern Asian Empires at Royal Holloway, University of London. 

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Fernanda Altieri graduated at the University of Bologna in 2001. In 2005 she discussed her Phd thesis at the University of Trento. She joined the Istituto Storico italo-germanico in 2006, where she mainly worked on the Early Modern moral discourse on sexuality.

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Luis Fernandez Gonzalez is a Maître de conférences at the University of Tolouse II, Le Mirail

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Filippo Falcone was awarded a PhD in English by the Università degli Studi di Milano in 2012 and has been actively engaged in research work ever since. His interests range from the interface of literature and theology in early modern British literature to the historical context of religious dissent and radicalism in England, Italy and North America.

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Francesca Mattei is post-doc researcher in Politecnico di Milano. She obtained the degree in Architecture (IUAV University of Venice, 2006), the Master in Architectural History (University of Roma Tre, 2008) and the PhD in History of Architecture and Urbanism (IUAV University of Venice, 2012).

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Frédéric Gabriel is a researcher at the CNRS (Historical institute of early modern thought, ENS, Lyon). He holds a Phd in history of philosophy, University of Lecce (Salento) – University of Paris IV-Sorbonne. Fields of research : ecclesiology, heresiology, theology, religious dissidence, free thought.

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Giovanni Tarantino MLitt MA PhD FRHistS is a Research Fellow of the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions (1100-1800) at the University of Melbourne, working on the early modern English representations of the persecution of Waldensians.

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Giulia Modena  is a Graduate Student in Modern History, Doctoral Program in Historical and Anthropological Sciences at the University of Verona (in partnership with the University Ca’ Foscari of Venice and the University of Padua: Scuola Superiore di Studi storici, geografici e antropologici), Clandestine Literature, Readers and Irreligiousness in Italy between 16th and 17th centuries.

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Guido Dall'Olio is currently associate professor of Early Modern History, University of Urbino Carlo Bo. His main research interests are: Heresy and Inquisition in Early Modern Italy, Demonic possession, witchcraft, and exorcism in Early Modern Europe, the representations of divine justice in early modern popular culture.

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Helena Wangefelt Ström is a PhD student in Museology at the Umeå University, with History of Ideas and Science as previous main field. Her dissertation project (started in 2012) has the preliminary title Enchanted heritage - disenchanted sacredness: The heritagisation of religion as an act of control and is based on a premodern case study set in 17th century Rome. 

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Jennifer Hillman is British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow at the School of History and Centre for the History of Emotions at Queen Mary, University of London, 2013-2016. She completed a PhD in History at the University of York in 2012, and then spent one year at the European University Institute as a Max Weber Postdoctoral Fellow. She has recently completed her first book manuscript – entitled Female Piety and the Catholic Reformation in France which will be published in 2014 by Pickering & Chatto in the Religious Cultures in the Early Modern World Series. It is a study of the unique culture of worship practiced by seventeenth-century lay, rigorist women, usually known as the 'Belles Amies de Port Royal.' The book argues that their devotional culture was characterised by intimate spiritual friendships, an aversion towards the licentious culture of an increasingly libertine royal court and distinctive, anti-Baroque devotional practices. 

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Joanna Kostylo, British School at Rome

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Jonathan Seiling is a Fellow of the Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies and has studied the suppression of radical Reformation leaders and groups, particularly Anabaptists in the 1520-1530s. The Catholic controversialist Johann Fabri von Leutkirch (1478-1541) who played a key role in proscribing Anabaptism in the 1520s in the Holy Roman Empire, has been the focus of his postdoctoral research.

Juliane Engelhardt is associate professor in European history 1650-1850 at the University of Copenhagen. She has previously been visiting fellow at universities and research institutions in Göttingen, Cambridge, Berlin and Halle. The subject of her research is a comparative study of early modern ascetic revival movements (Puritans, Methodists, Pietists, Herrnhuts among others) in England and Scotland, Denmark-Norway and the Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation. In particular she is interested in how these movements promulgated ascetic codes of conduct and influenced the secular culture of the rising middle classes in the 18th and beginning of the 19th century. 

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Julien Goeury is Professor of French Literature of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries at the University of Picardy Jules Verne (TRAME).

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Laurent Curelly is Senior Lecturer in British Studies at the University of Upper Alsace-Mulhouse. He has written numerous articles on Civil War journalism as well as sectarian radicalism.

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Lionel Laborie is a visiting Researcher at Goldsmiths, University of London. 

Areas of research and teaching interest: Religious dissent and toleration, enthusiasm and millenarianism, social networks in early modern Europe. Anglo-French relations (17th-18th centuries), the Huguenot diaspora, wars of religion and absolutism. History of ideas, history of madness and the Enlightenment.

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Lisa Roscioni is Assistant Professor on Early Modern History at University of Parma, Department of Arts and Literature, History and Social Studies, since 2006. 

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Formation

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Luca Addante (1970) worked at the University of Rome 2, at the EHESS in Paris, and at the University Ca' Foscari in Venice. He is currently an assistant professor of Early Modern History at the University of Turin.

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Lucia Felici is an Associated professor of Early Modern History (History of the Reformation and Counter-Reformation) at the University of Florence (Dipartimento di Studi storici e geografici). 

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Lucinda Martin currently holds a position at the Gotha Research Centre of the University of Erfurt, where she is carrying out a DFG-funded research project on the activities of the English Philadelphian Society in Germany. Her doctoral studies (funded by DAAD and the Max Planck Institute for History) took place at the Universities of Texas (Austin) and Göttingen. Her dissertation on Pietist women was named by the American Council of Graduate Schools as one the five best dissertations in the US for 2002-03. She has taught courses at the University of Würzburg and the University of Siegen and has held post-docs at the Martin Luther University in Halle and the Young Center for Pietist Studies in Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania.

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Manuela Águeda García-Garrido is Maître de Conférence at the University of Caen Lower-Normandy. She is member of the CLEA (Civilisation et littérature d’Espagne et d’Amérique du Moyen Âge aux Lumières) at the University of Paris-Sorbonne (Paris IV).

 

About


Manuela Bragagnolo studied law at the University of Trento. In 2009 she got her Ph.D in history of law and European legal thought, at the University of Trento, with a dissertation on Lodovico Antonio Muratori’s legal and political thought.

 

Through the study of Muratori’s sources, linked to the Reformation, she directed her scientific interests to the history of legal, political and religious thought of the XVIth Century, which is the focus of her current research. She is also interested in the circulation of protestant political ideas in late Renaissance Italy and in the history of physiognomy, in the XVIth and XVIIth Centuries. She was a temporary research fellow at the University of Trento (2009-2010), and she received grants for research at the École Normale Supérieure, Lyon (2004, 2007, 2008) and at the Institut d’histoire de la Réformation, Genève (2010; 2012). Now she is an Italian lecturer at the École Normale Supérieure in Lyon, France. 
 

 

 
 

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Marco Cavarzere, former student of the Scuola Normale Superiore and of the University of Pisa, is a research fellow at the Dipartimento di civiltà e forme del sapere of the University of Pisa. His main research interests deal with the analysis of the relationships between Catholics and Protestants in the early modern age and, more generally, with the study of the historical process through which an Italian confessional identity was formed during the Counterreformation.

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Mario Biagioni was born on 7 February 1960 in Pistoia, where he still lives (via Montalbano 605/b, 51034 Serravalle Pistoiese) and works. He teaches Humanities and Latin in high school “Amedeo di Savoia duca d’Aosta” since 1987.

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Mario InfeliseUniversità di Venezia

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Martine Hardy is a graduate student in Early Modern History, enrolled for a History Ph.D. in co-direction at the University of Montreal and Paris XIII.

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Mathilde Bernard is a Doctor of French Literature from the University of Paris III, Sorbonne Nouvelle. She teaches French in high school and she works for the French National Research Agency (ANR), for the project “Les pouvoirs de l’art”. Her thesis was about the role of fear in the historical writings of the Religious Wars in France ad she now focuses on the polemical and narrative texts of the 16th and 17th centuries surrounding the phenomena of religious conversions.

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Michael Driedger is an associate professor of history at Brock University in St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada. His teaching duties and interests range widely and include: historiography and research methods; the history of Protestant radicalism; and apocalyptic movements in world history. He has experimented with role-playing as a method of teaching history.

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Michaela Valente was awarded a Ph.D. in Early Modern History at the University "La Sapienza" in Rome in 2000. She has won fellowships at the Associazione Amici di Anna Maria Battista (1996), Fondazione Luigi Firpo (2000), at the University of Salerno, at CNR. Since 2005 she is Professore Associato of Early Modern History at Università del Molise and "La Sapienza", Università di Roma.

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Miriam Eliav-Feldon, former director of the Morris E. Curiel Institute for European Studies at Tel Aviv University (in 2005–2014) and longtime editor of the Israeli historical journal Zmanim, specializes in the cultural and religious history of early modern Europe.

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Monika Frohnapfel is a PhD-student in history. The working title of her doctoral thesis is:Perception of religious deviance and exclusion in early modern Spain. Women and the Spanish Inquisition, 1600-1650. directed by Prof. Dr. Ludolf Pelizaeus.

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Naomi Pullin is an early career researcher at the University of Oxford, where she co-ordinates the History Faculty’s Centre for Gender, Identity and Subjectivity and acts as the project co-ordinator for the interdisciplinary research network, Women in the Humanities, which is affiliated with The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities (TORCH).

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Nicolas Fornerod, Institute d'Histoire de la Réformation, Université de Genève

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Silvia Berti teaches Early Modern History at the Department of Philosophy, La Sapienza, University in Rome. She completed her scholarly formation thanks to a number of fellowships awarded by the following research centres: the Shelby Cullom Davis Center for Historical Studies of Princeton University (1993-1994), the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington (1996), the Center for Advanced Judaic Studies in Philadelphia (1999-2000), the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles and the NIAS (both in 2006-2007) in Wassenaar. She has lectured at most of these institutions, as well as the Collège de France and the Sorbonne in Paris, Berkeley University, the Freie Universität in Berlin and the Forschungszentrum Gotha of the University of Erfurt.

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Nere Jone Intxaustegi Jauregi is a PhD student in Early Modern History at the University of the Basque Country (Spain).

Her dissertation project (started in 2012) has the title The female conventual life in the Basque Country: the Poor Clares in Biscay during the Modern Ages. The aim is to explore the Poor Clares in Biscay: their history, their economy, the role played both by the women in those convents and the religion in the 16th – 18th society. The project focuses on women and on religiosity.

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Oviciu Olar – Romanian Academy

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Pasquale Terracciano (PhD. 2011, Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa) is Research Fellow at the Scuola Normale Superiore. His research interests deal with early modern philosophy and theology, with particular focus on the debates on nonconformist afterlifes. He is also interested in italian intellectual migration, history of historiography and history of cartography.

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Philip Soergel, University of Maryland

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Andreas Pietsch is an early modern historian. He is currently research fellow at the 'Exzellenzcluster' "Religion and Politics in Pre-Modern and Modern Cultures" at Muenster University (Germany).

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Riccarda Suitner is currently a fellow of the Studienstiftung des deutschen Volkes (German National Merit Foundation) at the Gotha Research Centre of the University of Erfurt. 

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Sarah Green is a part time PhD student in the History department at the University of Bristol. Her current research interests lie in the metaphysics of John Pordage and the German versions of his texts, esotericism and the transmission of concealed knowledge in the early modern period.

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Simone Maghenzani is an alumnus of the University of Turin, where he graduated in Early Modern History for his BA (2008) and MA (2010). In 2014, he is completing his PhD, titledThe Reformation in Italy. Propaganda and dissent from the Peace of Augsburg to the Treaty of the Pyrenees (1555-1660). He has been Academic Visitor in the University of Oxford (St Cross College), and Visiting Scholar at Sidney Sussex College, University of Cambridge (2012-2013). 

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Stefania Salvadori

Research Fellow at the Herzog August Bibliothek, Wolfenbüttel.

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Stefano Villani, University of Maryland

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Sünne Juterczenka teaches Early Modern History at Berlin’s Humboldt University. She earned her PhD at Göttingen University (2006) with a study on 17th missionary journeys to Europe (Über Gott und die Welt, 2008). She has worked at the Max Planck Institute for History in Göttingen (2003-2006) and has held postdoctoral fellowships in the graduate school "Cultural Contact and the Discourses of Scholarship" at Rostock University (2007-2009) and at the "International Graduate Center for the Study of Culture" (GCSC) at Gießen University (2009-2010). She has a specific interest in missions, cultural encounters and transcultural religious discourses.

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Sylvain Piron, EHESS

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Tamar Herzig (1975) is Associate Professor of History and Director (since October 2014) of the Morris E. Curiel Institute at Tel Aviv University, specializing in early modern European religious and gender history. She currently also serves as the Renaissance Society of America’s Discipline Representative for Religion and as a member of the editorial board of Renaissance Quarterly. Her research interests include the evolution of religious reform movement, heretical currents, and demonological notions from the fifteenth to the seventeenth centuries, and her publications have explored the configuration of witchcraft, mystical sanctity and heterodoxy.

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Theodor Dunkelgrün

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Umberto Grassi is a research fellow at the Scuola Normale Superiore in Pisa. He is currently working within the FIRB project: Beyond "Holy War". Managing Conflicts and Crossing Cultural Borders between Christendom and Islam from the Mediterranean to the extra-European World: Mediation, Transfer, Conversion (XVth-XIXth Century).

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William Gibson is Professor of Ecclesiastical History and Director of the Oxford Centre for Methodism and Church History, Oxford Brookes University, UK.

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Adelisa Malena (Bari, 1969) studied History in Pisa and in Tübingen. In 2002 she got her PhD at the Scuola Normale Superiore in Pisa.with a dissertation on the Roman Inquisition and Mysticism in 17th century Italy

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Alessandro Arcangeli  (Professor of Early Modern History, University of Verona) is a cultural historian of early modern Europe with particular research interests in dance, leisure and medical thought.

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Anne-Charlott Trepp is Professor of History of the Early Modern Period at the University of Kassel (since 2012).

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Emese Balint is Marie Curie Research Fellow at the European University Institute, Florence, where she's working on the project: “Transnational Networking, Knowledge Circulation and Technological Change in Early Modern East Central Europe. The Case of Hutterite Artisans (c.1560-1720)”, and on the written Sources of the Hutterite Communities in East Central Europe.

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Federico Barbierato (1972) is a lecturer in Early Modern History and he teaches Historical Anthropology at the Verona University (Italy). His research interests

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Jean-Pierre Cavaillé (1959) is Maître de Conférences at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (since 1999), Toulouse (LISST – CAS), where he teachs historical anthropology after being lecturer of intellectual history at the EHESS in Paris (CRH – GRIHL). 

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Sophie Houdard is a Professor of French Literature of the Seventeenth-century at the University of Paris III, Sorbonne Nouvelle, 13 rue Santeuil, 75005 Paris-France. 

She is the Director of «Formes et idées de la Renaissance aux Lumières», part of the Research Group GRIHL (Groupe de Recherche Interdiciplinaire sur l’Histoire du Littéraire » (Paris 3/EHESS) at the University of Paris III - Sorbonne Nouvelle.

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Xenia von Tippelskirch is junior professor of Renaissance History at the Humboldt–Universität zu Berlin. Her current research interests lie in the history of mystical movements in France and the Holy Roman Empire (17th–18th century) and in the history of spiritual childhood;

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