Fashioning the Early Modern Courtier

© Society for Renaissance Studies 2018

Original author: RWillie
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Speculum Reading Group

Last spring we launched a Speculum reading group as one way to keep abreast of new directions in Medieval Studies (broadly speaking), beyond what we already do via the Wednesday lunchtime workshops and other campus events.  Our plan is to meet, a few weeks after the publication of each issue of the journal, for discussion, which is generally focused on three articles selected from the recent issue.

Our next gathering will be on Friday, November 17 from 12-1:30pm, in Lane History Corner Rm 302.  Lunch will be served, so please RSVP to Mae Lyons-Penner (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) if you plan to attend and to alert us to any dietary restrictions.

For the next meeting, we plan to discuss the following articles (all from the October 2017 issue):

1) George Dameron: “Feeding the Medieval Italian City-State: Grain, War, and Political Legitimacy in Tuscany, c. 1150–c. 1350” (discussion leader: Rowan Dorin)

2) Dyan Elliott: “Violence against the Dead: The Negative Translation and damnatio memoriae in the Middle Ages” (discussion leader: Lauren Judd)

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Digital Manuscripts Workshop

December 1, 2017 - 9:30am to 12:30pm

A growing number of images from cultural heritage institutions around the world are available for use and re-use by scholars through the International Image Interoperability Framework (http://iiif.io). This framework and community facilitates comparison of materials across repositories through a common protocol. It also allows for the use of a number of lightweight tools that can be hosted at your institution, or on your laptop, for viewing, annotation, transcription, and collection-building. This workshop will focus on discovery of interoperable resources, building collections of resources for teaching and research, and the use of tools that support these activities. No previous experience with IIIF is required. Each participant will get hands-on experience gathering materials from across the web, working with software tools to compare and annotate those materials, and with ample time for in-workshop experimentation and discussion.

Original author: Mae Lyons-Penner
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Connoisseurship and the Knowledge of Art in the Netherlands, 1400 to the present

CALL FOR PAPERS: NEDERLANDS KUNSTHISTORISCH JAARBOEK, VOL. 69, 2019
 

 
Connoisseurship has long been suspect. Though essential to the study of material objects, it has been opposed to the more ‘substantive’ discipline of academic art history, and reviled as outmoded and elitist, as tainted by the market, and as concerned merely with such artist-reifying/mystifying issues as attribution, authenticity and the autograph ‘hand’. The connoisseur – with typically his ‘eye’ – has been dismissed as a dinosaur.
 
Yet, the practice of connoisseurship has continued apace – indeed, has been reinvented – in print rooms and museums, in the venues of the art market, and in the monographic projects, large and small, that have catalogued and re-catalogued the works of major and minor masters, now with the aid of ever changing methods of technical investigation. In the Netherlands, the Rembrandt Research Project; seven-volume Rembrandt: The New Hollstein, of 2013; and Corpus Rubenianum have relied on and advanced the methods of connoisseurship. So too have such collaborative investigative initiatives as the Bosch Project and Lasting Support: An Interdisciplinary Research Project to Assess the Structural Condition of the Ghent Altarpiece, which led to the cleaning of Van Eyck’s masterpiece.
 
Recently, moreover, connoisseurship has been historicized and theorized. Recognizing early modern connoisseurship as a kind of knowledge-based expertise that was the purview of kunstkenners and liefhebbers (art lovers), as opposed to naamkoopers (name buyers), has shed light on historical notions of authenticity, originality, quality, style, judgment, and discernment, as well as on the practices of art making and collecting, of workshop practices and collaboration. Understood in the context of its historical development, and through such early interlocutors as Van Mander, Van Hoogstraten, De Lairesse, Bosse, and De Piles, connoisseurship takes on new dimensions, as do its problematic aspects, such as its association with the practices (and malpractices) of art dealers. Theorized as a method of visual analysis, connoisseurship has been given new life – as a ‘new connoisseurship’ – in its association with technical art history and the scientific investigation of works of art, with intuition and neuroscience, as well as with the computational analysis of large data sets.
 
This volume of the NKJ seeks proposals that explore the connoisseurship – and the connoisseur – of Netherlandish art by bringing together new research into their history, recent practice, and conceptualization. Questions to consider include, but are not limited to:

What is the relation between connoisseurship and our understanding of style, quality, and the history of taste, and of concepts of the artist? How can new insights into early modern artistic practices, and into the attitudes of painters, kenners and liefhebbers towards authorship, impact present day practices of attribution and notions of ‘authentic’ or ‘autograph’ works? How can we think about connoisseurship across media? Are interpretations of the results of technical investigations nothing other than classical connoisseurship? Or do these apparently objective methods make connoisseurship rooted in the personal experience of the connoisseur obsolete? Can the ‘new connoisseurship’ raise new questions and alter the traditional goals and objectives of connoisseurship? Can cognitive and neuro-scientific research provide evidence about how and why connoisseurship works? How are seeing and knowing related, and how were they considered to be related in the past? What is the future of connoisseurship and do we need a better term for these practices?

 
The NKJ is dedicated to a particular theme each year and promotes innovative scholarship and articles that employ a diversity of approaches to the study of Netherlandish art in its wider context. For more information, see
http://www.brill.com/publications/netherlands-yearbook-history-art-neder...
 
Contributions to the NKJ (in Dutch, English, German or French) are limited to a maximum of 7,500 words, excluding notes and bibliography. Following a peer review process and receipt of the complete text, the editorial board will make final decisions on the acceptance of papers.
 
Please send a 500-word proposal and a short CV to the volume editors by January 15, 2018:
 
H. Perry Chapman This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Dulcia Meijers This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
Schedule:
15 January 2018: Deadline for submission of proposals.
February 2018: Notifications about proposals.
1 May 2018: Deadline for submission of first drafts.
August 2018: Comments by reviewers and editors to contributors.
December 2018: Final drafts.
Spring 2019: Images ready, copy editing, print proofs for correction.
Winter 2019: Publication.

Original author: RWillie
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Post at Newcastle

© Society for Renaissance Studies 2017

Original author: RWillie
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Burkhardt at 200

An interdisciplinary conference to be held at the British Academy, London

 

The bicentenary of the birth of the Swiss scholar, Jacob Burckhardt (25 May 1818 - 8 August 1897), author of Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy (1860), seems an appropriate moment at which take stock and consider whether or not the idea of an ‘Italian Renaissance’ is still a hermeneutically helpful one. This conference will task an interdisciplinary team of scholars of Renaissance studies as well as of Burckhardt himself to interrogate both the Swiss historian’s own agenda as well as the contemporary validity and helpfulness of the label ‘Italian Renaissance’. Specific reference will be made to the themes treated in his classic account: the state as a work of art; development of the individual; revival of antiquity; discovery of the world and of man; society and festivals; morality and religion.

 

Speakers: Robert Black (Leeds, Emeritus), Jill Burke (Edinburgh), Virginia Cox (NYU Villa La Pietra, Florence), Wietse de Boer (Miami, Ohio), Marco Gentile (Parma), Mary Laven (Cambridge), Mikkel Mangold (Basel), Giuseppe Marcocci (Oxford), Sarah Ross (Boston), Nicholas Terpstra (Toronto), Joan-Pau Rubies (Barcelona Pompeu Fabre), Will Stenhouse (Yeshiva, New York), Claudia Wedepohl (Warburg Institute) and Barbara von Reibnitz (Basel)

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Musical Culture in the Wars of Religion, 1550-1650

St Catharine's College, Cambridge

 

Talks by:

Peter Bennett (Case Western Reserve) Marie-Alexis Colin (Brussels) Tom Hamilton (Cambridge) Kat Hill (Birkbeck) David van der Linden (Groningen) Margaret McGowan (Sussex) Emilie Murphy (York) David Potter (Kent) Alex Robinson (Cambridge) John Romey (Case Western Reserve) Daniel Trocmé Latter (Cambridge)and featuring a lecture-recital by Edward Wickham and the Choir of St Catharine's College, Cambridge of the Dodecacorde of Claude Le Jeune Edward Wickham (Cambridge)

 

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Greg Walker (Edinburgh, English): "'The red blood runneth down about my head': Reformation, Moderation, and Innovation in John Heywood’s 'The Pardoner and the Friar''"

November 29, 2017 - 12:00pm to 1:15pm
Original author: Mae Lyons-Penner
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Ruling Sexualities: Sexuality, Gender and the Crown

CALL FOR PAPERS

Kings & Queens Conference 7

The Kings & Queens conference series will be hosted by Historic Royal Palaces and the University of Winchester for its seventh edition on 9-12 July 2018. The first day will be held at Hampton Court Palace with the remaining days at the University of Winchester.

We aim to connect scholars across the world whose research focuses on topics related to royal history, diplomacy, art history, political history, biographical studies or any other issues included in the scope of royal studies. This edition of the Kings and Queens conference will have a particular focus on gender and sexuality as central themes. We are especially interested in studies relating to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Queer (LGBTQ) identities and the role of sexuality and gender to royal histories.

 

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Medieval and Early Modern Spaces and Places

 The Open University, Milton Keynes

 

Following a successful first workshop in February 2017, The Open University will be hosting a one-day conference on spaces and places on 23 February 2018, drawing upon the interdisciplinary research interests of the OU’s Medieval and Early Modern Research Group.

Theoretical approaches have informed new ways of thinking about the social production of space (from Henri Lefebvre to David Harvey) and recent research networks have also stimulated novel approaches to early modern spaces (PALATIUM). Early modern spaces were mutable and permeable, and new technologies, objects, and social formations played a role in defining spaces as well as identities. The expansion of trade routes and economic networks, the development of the printing press, struggles for territorial power and religious wars, and new diplomatic frameworks, all contributed to new ways of conceptualising geographies and spaces.

 

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SRS@50

© Society for Renaissance Studies 2017

Original author: RWillie
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CMEMS Workshop with Luís Rodriguez Rincón (Stanford, ILAC)

December 6, 2017 - 12:00pm
Original author: Bjoern Klaus Buschbeck
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New acquisitions in Medieval and Early Modern books and manuscripts: Open House on Oct. 5th

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October 5, 2017 - 11:00am to 2:00pm

Barchas Room, Department of Special Collections, Green Library

On Thursday, October 5th, 2017, there will be an Open House in the Special Collections Department of Green Library from 11:00am-2:00pm. On display will be new acquisitions in medieval and early modern books and manuscripts. Please feel free to drop by for a quick look or an in-depth exploration of the materials on display.

Image: Certificate, 1758 June 4, of cooperage for Johann Gabriel Schwarzmann of Copenhagen (Dept. of Special Collections Manuscript Collection M2188)

Event Sponsor: 

Stanford University Libraries, Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies

Original author: Anonymous
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Perfume and Gunpowder Podcast

© Society for Renaissance Studies 2017

Original author: RWillie
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CMEMS Workshop

At Stanford, we aim to create a dynamic and collegial research and teaching environment in Medieval and Early Modern Studies, both through scholarly exchange and through genuine intellectual engagement in our vibrant programs.

Original author: Mae Lyons-Penner
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CMEMS Workshop

At Stanford, we aim to create a dynamic and collegial research and teaching environment in Medieval and Early Modern Studies, both through scholarly exchange and through genuine intellectual engagement in our vibrant programs.

Original author: Mae Lyons-Penner
Tags:

CMEMS Workshop

At Stanford, we aim to create a dynamic and collegial research and teaching environment in Medieval and Early Modern Studies, both through scholarly exchange and through genuine intellectual engagement in our vibrant programs.

Original author: Mae Lyons-Penner
Tags:

CMEMS Workshop

At Stanford, we aim to create a dynamic and collegial research and teaching environment in Medieval and Early Modern Studies, both through scholarly exchange and through genuine intellectual engagement in our vibrant programs.

Original author: Mae Lyons-Penner
Tags:

CMEMS Workshop

At Stanford, we aim to create a dynamic and collegial research and teaching environment in Medieval and Early Modern Studies, both through scholarly exchange and through genuine intellectual engagement in our vibrant programs.

Original author: Mae Lyons-Penner
Tags:

Special Collections Open House

October 5, 2017 - 11:00am to 2:00pm

Barchas Room, Green Library

On Thursday, October 5th, 2017, there will be an Open House in the Special Collections Department of Green Library from 11:00am-2:00pm. On display will be new acquisitions in medieval and early modern books and manuscripts. Please feel free to drop by for a quick look or an in-depth exploration of the materials on display.

Original author: Jean Abbott
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