Emanuele Lugli: "The Transfiguration of Measure and the Heights of Christ"

February 6, 2018 - 5:30pm to 7:00pm

OSHMAN HALL, MCMURTRY BUILDING

This talk focuses on the singular devotion for the 'mensura Christi,' or the act of praying with objects that reproduced the height of Christ. It explores the reasons for its phenomenal success, from its diffusion in the twelfth century up to its ban in the seventeenth, and the motives for its equally extraordinary absence in historical accounts today. The talk asks questions about what turns an orthodox veneration into a mere superstition, an inversion that is all the more puzzling given that the 'mensura Christi' relies on measuring, one of the methods to fight credulity. The lecture thus reconsiders the relationship of measuring practices and visual belief while assessing the validity of 'trans-figuration' as an art historical concept, thus contributing to discussions on representations, faith, and material studies.

Emanuele Lugli teaches and writes about art, architecture and visual culture in medieval and early modern Europe, with a particular emphasis on Mediterranean trade, technology, and intellectual connections. His theoretical concerns include questions of scale and labor, the history of measurements, notions of precision and vagueness, the making of fashion and the fabrication of networks.

Original author: Mae Lyons-Penner
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Henrike Christiane Lange (Art History and Italian, Berkeley): "A Compass for Relief Theory"

January 30, 2018 - 5:30pm to 7:00pm

Oshman Hall, McMurtry Building

How can we calibrate a scholar’s compass on a journey into the history of relief sculpture? In a world that privileges the flat image on canvas or computer screen, and still reveres sculpture in the round, I propose to rehabilitate relief as a driving force in the history of art. Visual relief effects across media help to form cultural environments by intertwining collective and individual modes of perception. Considering relief as symbolic form, three case studies from the Medieval Baltic, Renaissance Mediterranean, and Global Contemporary sequentially raise the question of presence, individualization, and democratization as categories for a dynamic theory of relief. This project relates brick reliefs from Baltic cathedrals to the artistic dialogue between Donatello and Mantegna in sculpture and painting as a crucial moment for the intellectual foundations of early modernity. Finally, modern brick relief sculpture and contemporary practices of relief carving in North America indicate the persistence of the medium as cultural agent into the present day.

Henrike C. Lange holds a joint appointment in the Departments of Art History and Italian Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. She specializes in European medieval and early modern art, architecture, visual culture, and literature in relation to the Mediterranean. Lange has a second area of expertise in nineteenth and twentieth century historiography, literature, and art in Europe and the United States. Her scholarship focuses on questions of perspective, narrative, medium, materiality, and metaphysics in specific historical contexts. Lange’s art historical practice and teaching are informed by her curatorial background and work experience in German, Italian, American, and British museum collections. Henrike Lange is a Distinguished Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study at the University of Notre Dame (2017-2018) where she is preparing her current book manuscript, Giotto’s Triumph: The Arena Chapel, the Roman Jubilee of 1300, and the Question of Modernity.

Original author: Mae Lyons-Penner
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Mackenzie Cooley (Stanford, History) "Rape of the New World: Metaphor, Rape, Conquest"

February 27, 2018 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm

This presentation is part of the Trauma and History Workshop: Plague, Fire, War, and Rebellion.

Original author: Mae Lyons-Penner
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Kevin Terraciano (UCLA): "Memories of the War in Mexico Tenochtitlan"

February 20, 2018 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm

This presentation is part of the Trauma and History Workshop: Plague, Fire, War, and Rebellion.

Original author: Mae Lyons-Penner
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Sigrun Haude (Arizona): "Facing the Trauma of the Thirty Years' War"

February 6, 2018 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm

This presentation is part of the Trauma and History Workshop: Plague, Fire, War, and Rebellion.

Original author: Mae Lyons-Penner
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Graylin Harrison (Stanford, Art History): "Representing Naples: The Revolt of 1647-8"

January 30, 2018 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm

Stanford Art History graduate student Graylin Harrison discusses violent images of the Neapolitan Revolt of 1647-48, known to historians as the Revolt of Massaniello. The revolt in Naples became emblematic of social disorder and the violence of crowd rule during the political upheavals of the seventeenth century.

This presentation is part of the Trauma and History Workshop: Plague, Fire, War, and Rebellion.

Original author: Mae Lyons-Penner
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Chet Van Duzer: "Making the World Go 'Round: How Urbano Monte Created his Map of 1587"

February 23, 2018 - 3:30pm

David Rumsey Map Center, Bing Wing of Green Library

On February 23rd at 3.30 pm, the David Rumsey Map Center will have on display the original 430 year old Urbano Monte 1587 map long with its 10 feet by 10 feet facsimile and its virtual derivatives at the Center.  This will be followed by a talk featuring Chet van Duzer, History of Cartography scholar and recent David and Abby Rumsey Fellow at the David Rumsey Map Center and the John Carter Brown Library in Boston. Chet will be presenting on his research conducted over the course of 3 months on the Urbano Monte 1587 map. 

The talk is entitled: Making the World Go 'Round: How Urbano Monte Created his Map of 1587

Urbano Monte's map of 1587 is a spectacular creation, designed to be assembled into an image of the world 10.5 feet in diameter, on an unusual projection, intended to be rotated about its center, and elaborately decorated with images of sovereigns, sea monsters, and animals. In this talk Chet Van Duzer will present new research how Urbano Monte went about making the map: the events and works that inspired him, the sources from which he borrowed, and his own statements about the map.

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Stephen Harrison (Corpus Christi College, Oxford): The Roman Novel in France: Apuleius and La Fontaine

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January 19, 2018 - 12:30pm to 1:30pm

This talk is part of a larger project looking at the reception of the long two-book love story of Cupid (Amor or ‘Love’ in Latin) and Psyche (‘Soul’ in Greek), which forms the centrepiece of the Latin novel Metamorphoses or The Golden Ass by the second-century CE writer Apuleius, in European literature, art and opera from 1600 to the present day. Apuleius’ tale narrates how the beautiful princess Psyche gains the enmity of Venus, goddess of love, but the love of Venus’ son Cupid, and how after a series of tribulations and adventures (involving jealous sisters, a husband of mysterious identity, a dramatic revelation scene and an epic-style journey to the Underworld) the two are united in happy marriage and Psyche becomes a goddess. The talk deals with the influential French adaptation (1669) of the tale by Jean La Fontaine, author of the famous Fables, which formed the basis for several adaptations of the story in the time of Louis XIV and the fairy tale of Beauty and the Beast. All French and Latin will be translated.

Stephen Harrison has been teaching Classics at Corpus Christi College, Oxford since 1987 and is Professor of Latin Literature at the University of Oxford. His main research and teaching interests are in Latin literature and its reception. He has written books on Virgil, Horace and on the Roman novelist Apuleius, and has edited, co-edited or co-authored more than twenty books on Virgil, Horace, the Roman Novel, Classics, and literary theory–as well as Latin literature in general and on the reception of classical literature. He is an occasional visiting professor at the Universities of Copenhagen and Trondheim and currently serving as William H. Bonsall Visiting Professor at Stanford University.

Event Sponsor: 

Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, Department of Classics

Original author: Anonymous
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Palaeography Slam!

At Stanford, we aim to create a dynamic and collegial research and teaching environment in Medieval and Early Modern Studies, both through scholarly exchange and through genuine intellectual engagement in our vibrant programs.

Original author: Mae Lyons-Penner
Tags:

Palaeography Slam!

At Stanford, we aim to create a dynamic and collegial research and teaching environment in Medieval and Early Modern Studies, both through scholarly exchange and through genuine intellectual engagement in our vibrant programs.

Original author: Mae Lyons-Penner
Tags:

Palaeography Slam!

At Stanford, we aim to create a dynamic and collegial research and teaching environment in Medieval and Early Modern Studies, both through scholarly exchange and through genuine intellectual engagement in our vibrant programs.

Original author: Mae Lyons-Penner
Tags:

Palaeography Slam!

At Stanford, we aim to create a dynamic and collegial research and teaching environment in Medieval and Early Modern Studies, both through scholarly exchange and through genuine intellectual engagement in our vibrant programs.

Original author: Mae Lyons-Penner
Tags:

Palaeography Slam!

At Stanford, we aim to create a dynamic and collegial research and teaching environment in Medieval and Early Modern Studies, both through scholarly exchange and through genuine intellectual engagement in our vibrant programs.

Original author: Mae Lyons-Penner
Tags:

On Belonging: English Conceptions of Migration and Transculturality, 1550 – 1700

© Society for Renaissance Studies 2018

Original author: RWillie
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CMEMS Workshop with Shirin A. Khanmohamadi (SFSU, Literature)

June 6, 2018 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Original author: Mae Lyons-Penner
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CMEMS Workshop with Michael Penn (Stanford, Religious Studies)

May 30, 2018 - 12:00pm to 1:15pm
Original author: Mae Lyons-Penner
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CMEMS Workshop with Danny Smith (Stanford, Art History)

May 23, 2018 - 12:00pm to 1:15pm
Original author: Mae Lyons-Penner
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CMEMS Workshop with Clare Lees (King's College London)

May 16, 2018 - 12:00pm to 1:15pm
Original author: Mae Lyons-Penner
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Karl Appuhn (NYU): “Machiavelli Behind Bars: Teaching Machiavelli in Prison in the Age of Trump”

May 9, 2018 - 12:00pm to 1:15pm
Original author: Mae Lyons-Penner
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CMEMS Workshop with Danielle Callegari (Berkeley)

May 2, 2018 - 12:00pm to 1:15pm
Original author: Mae Lyons-Penner
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